<< JUNE 2018 >>
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Jun 1, 2018 - Aug 31, 2018
Friday Art Walking Tours
New Mexico Museum of Art
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Weekly

Meet at the gift shop steps Fridays June through August. Please call the front desk to confirm: 505-476-5063. Cost: $10 per adult.

more information »

Jun 1, 2018
Music at the Museum
New Mexico Museum of Art
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Rio: Bossa Nova Jazz

more information »

Jun 1, 2018
FIRST FRIDAY - DA VINCI & TECHNOLOGY
Museum of Natural History and Science
5:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Discover how mechanical technology from the Renaissance is used to explore other planets.

more information »

Jun 1, 2018
Friday Evenings at The Museum
New Mexico Museum of Art
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

The entire museum is open from 5-7 PM.

more information »

Jun 1, 2018
Panel Discussion to Commemorate the Long Walk
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Join us on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Navajo Treaty - and the end of the Navajo peoples’ confinement at the Bosque Redondo - for a panel discussion with Roseanne Willink and Joyce Begay-Foss (both Navajo/Diné)

more information »

Jun 1, 2018 - Jun 2, 2019
Hweeldi: The Woven Tribute
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
Commemorating the Long Walk

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (MIAC) is commemorating the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Bosque Redondo, signed June 1, 1868, by displaying an extraordinary wool rug woven in tribute to the Long Walk. Created in the early 1900s, the rug is an impressive 9 ft. by 15 ft., last displayed at MIAC in 1996.

While the identity of the weavers of the piece remains unknown, Navajo oral history – and likely some first-hand accounts – informed the weavers along the way with their design. 

In 1868, the Long Walk was initiated by the United States military as part of Manifest Destiny, the concept that expansion of the United States in the 1800s was both justified and inevitable. Only the 1868 treaty allowed the Navajo to return to their Diné Bikéyah (Navajo sacred lands) in northwestern New Mexico, where they rebuilt as a nation of herders, farmers, and weavers.

more information »