here.

How they came to be at the Palace of the Governors is a tale as circuitous as it was fortuitous. The hides found their way back to the Southwest—and eventually to the Palace—more than 200 years after Philipp von Segesser von Brunegg, a Jesuit priest, sent them to his family in Switzerland in 1758. It is believed that he acquired them in Sonora, Mexico, between 1732 and 1758, from the Anzas, a family that was prominent in military and civil affairs in both New Mexico and the Sonoran village where Father Segesser’s mission was situated.

The existence of the hide paintings had long had been known, but their availability came to light in 1983 when another museum wanted to borrow them, only to discover that the von Segesser who then owned them wanted to sell rather than lend. Enter the interest of the Palace of the Governors, which purchased in 1988 the hide paintings designated Segesser I and Segesser II.

Segesser I and II were painted on hides, likely bison, that had been tanned to make them supple, pumiced so that the grain was no longer visible, and sewn together to form a large canvas. The hides do not exhibit any distinctive ground or gesso layer under the paint.

Some scholars believe that the Segesser Hide Paintings were created in New Mexico, where imported canvas was rare and processed hides were used for a variety of purposes, including paintings on hide, or reposteros, that were exported to Mexico. There is documentary evidence that hides were painted in workshops in Santa Fe. Because the Segesser renderings include several distinct styles, some scholars suggest that as many as three artists painted specific elements of the overall rendering. We believe that the artists were indigenous New Mexicans with tribal affiliation who had the benefit of eyewitness descriptions and were taught European painting techniques. Yet the Segesser paintings were not rendered in a traditional European style typical of military paintings of that era; rather they are more characteristic of indigenous or folk-art paintings.

The late 17th and early 18th centuries were the final great period of European battle tapestries. Such textiles, imported to the Americas, might have influenced the commissioned Segesser hides. The hides contain wide, broadly painted flower and leaf borders that simulate carved or gilded frames, which also was typical of European tapestries from the same era.

Segesser I

This set of hides represents an encounter between rival tribesmen, the attacking side possibly accompanied by a Spanish leader. Scholars agree that the painting’s features, including hills, cliffs, deciduous trees, bison, deer and pumas, indicate that this encounter took place over varied terrain.

Who took part in the conflict and where and when it occurred remains the subject of scholarly debate. Basing their theories on historical records and the painting’s account of the event, some scholars suggest that Segesser I portrays one or more Spanish officers with Indian allies—possibly the Manso, Opata, Tlascalan, Tarascan, Pima and a faction of the Suma—who are attacking rival Sumas or Apaches, in the El Paso, Texas region.

Others say that the painters were unfamiliar with both the encounter and the cultures involved, and so substituted familiar individuals, animals and terrain in a painting that actually portrays Pueblo Indian auxiliaries attacking Plains Apache Indians. Such fighting took place in any one of a half-dozen expeditions launched between 1693 and 1719 from the Palace to the eastern plains to discourage raids by tribal factions.

Because the encounter has not been pinpointed, it is not known if the individuals behind the wooden palisade are members of the defending tribe or captive slaves taken from other tribes. The attackers on horseback are equipped with Spanish weapons, clothing and leather armor to distinguish them from the opposition.

There are pieces missing from the original rendering. Parts were separated from the work sometime before 1908 and given to a Segesser family member where they are today.

Segesser II

These hides depict a disastrous, 1720 rout of Spanish troops and their allies in present-day Nebraska.

Throughout the Spanish Colonial period, officials at the Palace of the Governors routinely dispatched troops to patrol and explore beyond the colonial boundaries. Hearing of encroachment by the French, New Mexico Governor Antonio Valverde y Cosio dispatched Spanish troops and Pueblo Indian auxiliaries to verify the rumors. Led by New Mexico Lieutenant Governor and Commander-in-chief Pedro de Villasur, the military expedition also was charged with locating a suitable site on the remote eastern plains for a Spanish military post, requested by the Spanish Viceroy in Mexico City.

The Villasur expedition headed north from Santa Fe to Taos, turned east, then northeast into present-day Kansas. They followed a Pawnee route to the Platte River, moving north into eastern Nebraska. Beyond the junction of the Platte and Loup rivers, they encountered a large Pawnee Indian encampment. Villasur initiated a dialogue and asked Juan de Archibeque (Jean l’Archévêque), a Frenchman and expedition interpreter, to write a letter in French to a European within the Pawnee camp. The efforts failed and sensing a potentially hostile situation, the expedition retreated and camped at the confluence of the Loup and Platte rivers.

The Segesser II painting can be pinpointed to the August 13, 1720, skirmish at the expedition camp. After daybreak, the Pawnee and their Oto Indian allies—illustrated throughout the painting by their painted and unclothed bodies and shaved or close-cropped heads—ambushed the Villasur party. The painting also includes 37 French soldiers, identified by their European-style clothing—conical hats, coats, breeches, cuffs and leggings—firing long arms at the Spanish military expedition.

Composed of 43 royal troops, three Spanish civilians, 60 Pueblo Indian auxiliaries and several other Indian allies, the Villasur expedition was caught off guard, and the pitched battle left many of them for dead in the tall prairie grass. The attack was a major catastrophe for New Mexico and casualties amounted to a third of the province’s best soldiers. The center of the painting portrays French soldiers with Pawnee and Oto supporters surrounding the camp. At the right of the painting, Villasur expedition members who were guarding the animals are shown running to assist their Spanish comrades.

Interestingly, oral and written accounts of the battle do not mention French soldiers in the area of the encounter. Several Villasur survivors reported a volley of musket fire, but in the confusion of the battle, they did not know who was attacking them. It is possible that French traders took part in the ambush. Governor Valverde y Cosio, perhaps in an effort to defend the actions of Villasur, reported “two hundred Frenchmen had fired, supported by a countless number of Pawnee allies.”

 

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

Though the source of the Segesser Hide Paintings is obscure, their significance cannot be clearer: the hides are rare examples of the earliest known depictions of colonial life in the United States. Moreover, the tanned and smoothed hides carry the very faces of men whose descendants live in New Mexico today. Perhaps both paintings illustrate military expeditions dispatched from the Palace of the Governors, when it was called las casas reales, the royal houses.

The hides are on display in the Palace of the Governors; a computer interactive offering more detailed information about the sections is next door at the New Mexico History Museum (on the same campus) and can also be found online here.

How they came to be at the Palace of the Governors is a tale as circuitous as it was fortuitous. The hides found their way back to the Southwest—and eventually to the Palace—more than 200 years after Philipp von Segesser von Brunegg, a Jesuit priest, sent them to his family in Switzerland in 1758. It is believed that he acquired them in Sonora, Mexico, between 1732 and 1758, from the Anzas, a family that was prominent in military and civil affairs in both New Mexico and the Sonoran village where Father Segesser’s mission was situated.

The existence of the hide paintings had long had been known, but their availability came to light in 1983 when another museum wanted to borrow them, only to discover that the von Segesser who then owned them wanted to sell rather than lend. Enter the interest of the Palace of the Governors, which purchased in 1988 the hide paintings designated Segesser I and Segesser II.

Segesser I and II were painted on hides, likely bison, that had been tanned to make them supple, pumiced so that the grain was no longer visible, and sewn together to form a large canvas. The hides do not exhibit any distinctive ground or gesso layer under the paint.

Some scholars believe that the Segesser Hide Paintings were created in New Mexico, where imported canvas was rare and processed hides were used for a variety of purposes, including paintings on hide, or reposteros, that were exported to Mexico. There is documentary evidence that hides were painted in workshops in Santa Fe. Because the Segesser renderings include several distinct styles, some scholars suggest that as many as three artists painted specific elements of the overall rendering. We believe that the artists were indigenous New Mexicans with tribal affiliation who had the benefit of eyewitness descriptions and were taught European painting techniques. Yet the Segesser paintings were not rendered in a traditional European style typical of military paintings of that era; rather they are more characteristic of indigenous or folk-art paintings.

The late 17th and early 18th centuries were the final great period of European battle tapestries. Such textiles, imported to the Americas, might have influenced the commissioned Segesser hides. The hides contain wide, broadly painted flower and leaf borders that simulate carved or gilded frames, which also was typical of European tapestries from the same era.

Segesser I

This set of hides represents an encounter between rival tribesmen, the attacking side possibly accompanied by a Spanish leader. Scholars agree that the painting’s features, including hills, cliffs, deciduous trees, bison, deer and pumas, indicate that this encounter took place over varied terrain.

Who took part in the conflict and where and when it occurred remains the subject of scholarly debate. Basing their theories on historical records and the painting’s account of the event, some scholars suggest that Segesser I portrays one or more Spanish officers with Indian allies—possibly the Manso, Opata, Tlascalan, Tarascan, Pima and a faction of the Suma—who are attacking rival Sumas or Apaches, in the El Paso, Texas region.

Others say that the painters were unfamiliar with both the encounter and the cultures involved, and so substituted familiar individuals, animals and terrain in a painting that actually portrays Pueblo Indian auxiliaries attacking Plains Apache Indians. Such fighting took place in any one of a half-dozen expeditions launched between 1693 and 1719 from the Palace to the eastern plains to discourage raids by tribal factions.

Because the encounter has not been pinpointed, it is not known if the individuals behind the wooden palisade are members of the defending tribe or captive slaves taken from other tribes. The attackers on horseback are equipped with Spanish weapons, clothing and leather armor to distinguish them from the opposition.

There are pieces missing from the original rendering. Parts were separated from the work sometime before 1908 and given to a Segesser family member where they are today.

Segesser II

These hides depict a disastrous, 1720 rout of Spanish troops and their allies in present-day Nebraska.

Throughout the Spanish Colonial period, officials at the Palace of the Governors routinely dispatched troops to patrol and explore beyond the colonial boundaries. Hearing of encroachment by the French, New Mexico Governor Antonio Valverde y Cosio dispatched Spanish troops and Pueblo Indian auxiliaries to verify the rumors. Led by New Mexico Lieutenant Governor and Commander-in-chief Pedro de Villasur, the military expedition also was charged with locating a suitable site on the remote eastern plains for a Spanish military post, requested by the Spanish Viceroy in Mexico City.

The Villasur expedition headed north from Santa Fe to Taos, turned east, then northeast into present-day Kansas. They followed a Pawnee route to the Platte River, moving north into eastern Nebraska. Beyond the junction of the Platte and Loup rivers, they encountered a large Pawnee Indian encampment. Villasur initiated a dialogue and asked Juan de Archibeque (Jean l’Archévêque), a Frenchman and expedition interpreter, to write a letter in French to a European within the Pawnee camp. The efforts failed and sensing a potentially hostile situation, the expedition retreated and camped at the confluence of the Loup and Platte rivers.

The Segesser II painting can be pinpointed to the August 13, 1720, skirmish at the expedition camp. After daybreak, the Pawnee and their Oto Indian allies—illustrated throughout the painting by their painted and unclothed bodies and shaved or close-cropped heads—ambushed the Villasur party. The painting also includes 37 French soldiers, identified by their European-style clothing—conical hats, coats, breeches, cuffs and leggings—firing long arms at the Spanish military expedition.

Composed of 43 royal troops, three Spanish civilians, 60 Pueblo Indian auxiliaries and several other Indian allies, the Villasur expedition was caught off guard, and the pitched battle left many of them for dead in the tall prairie grass. The attack was a major catastrophe for New Mexico and casualties amounted to a third of the province’s best soldiers. The center of the painting portrays French soldiers with Pawnee and Oto supporters surrounding the camp. At the right of the painting, Villasur expedition members who were guarding the animals are shown running to assist their Spanish comrades.

Interestingly, oral and written accounts of the battle do not mention French soldiers in the area of the encounter. Several Villasur survivors reported a volley of musket fire, but in the confusion of the battle, they did not know who was attacking them. It is possible that French traders took part in the ambush. Governor Valverde y Cosio, perhaps in an effort to defend the actions of Villasur, reported “two hundred Frenchmen had fired, supported by a countless number of Pawnee allies.”

 

 

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 37_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 37_thumb.jpg [8] => 2007-04-24 [eventStartDate] => 2007-04-24 [9] => 2030-04-24 [eventEndDate] => 2030-04-24 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 19 [instID] => 19 [15] => 72 [contactID] => 72 [16] => 2017-07-22 13:52:40 [eventUpdated] => 2017-07-22 13:52:40 [17] => 37_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 37_1200.jpg [18] => 19 [19] => New Mexico History Museum [instName] => New Mexico History Museum [20] => 19.jpg [instFileName] => 19.jpg [urlSlug] => segesser-hide-paintings ) [3] => Array ( [0] => 31 [eventID] => 31 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción [eventTitle] => Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción contains bultos, retablos, and crucifijos dating from the late 1700s to 1900 which illustrate the distinctive tradition of santo making in New Mexico introduced by settlers from Mexico.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción contains bultos, retablos, and crucifijos dating from the late 1700s to 1900 which illustrate the distinctive tradition of santo making in New Mexico introduced by settlers from Mexico.

[5] =>

The exhibition contains bultos, retablos, and crucifijos, dating from the late 1700s to 1900. They demonstrate how European stylistic traditions and iconography were combined with new palettes, different styles, and distinctive regional decorative designs that transformed New Mexican santo making into a unique hybrid. Highlighting the exhibit will be esoteric pieces such as the Crucifixion in a Large Nicho by the Laguna Santero and La Santísima Trinidad, a wood retablo with an applied paper painting of the Holy Trinity.

The pieces in Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción show the diverse artistic responses that occurred as santeros answered the demand from their respective communities to bring devotional images into their churches, homes, and lives. The bultos, retablos, and crucifijos presented reveal a visual documentation of New Mexico’s cultural heritage.

The exhibit, once part of the private collection of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Frank, was recently purchased by the New Mexican legislature for the Palace of the Governors, New Mexico History Museum in order to preserve New Mexico’s cultural heritage. It is one of the defining traditional art forms of the region and a source of pride and identity for New Mexican Hispanics.

[eventFullDescription] =>

The exhibition contains bultos, retablos, and crucifijos, dating from the late 1700s to 1900. They demonstrate how European stylistic traditions and iconography were combined with new palettes, different styles, and distinctive regional decorative designs that transformed New Mexican santo making into a unique hybrid. Highlighting the exhibit will be esoteric pieces such as the Crucifixion in a Large Nicho by the Laguna Santero and La Santísima Trinidad, a wood retablo with an applied paper painting of the Holy Trinity.

The pieces in Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción show the diverse artistic responses that occurred as santeros answered the demand from their respective communities to bring devotional images into their churches, homes, and lives. The bultos, retablos, and crucifijos presented reveal a visual documentation of New Mexico’s cultural heritage.

The exhibit, once part of the private collection of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Frank, was recently purchased by the New Mexican legislature for the Palace of the Governors, New Mexico History Museum in order to preserve New Mexico’s cultural heritage. It is one of the defining traditional art forms of the region and a source of pride and identity for New Mexican Hispanics.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 31_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 31_thumb.jpg [8] => 2008-07-20 [eventStartDate] => 2008-07-20 [9] => 2030-07-20 [eventEndDate] => 2030-07-20 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 19 [instID] => 19 [15] => 72 [contactID] => 72 [16] => 2017-07-22 13:39:32 [eventUpdated] => 2017-07-22 13:39:32 [17] => 31_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 31_1200.jpg [18] => 19 [19] => New Mexico History Museum [instName] => New Mexico History Museum [20] => 19.jpg [instFileName] => 19.jpg [urlSlug] => treasures-of-devotion-tesoros-de-devocion ) [4] => Array ( [0] => 214 [eventID] => 214 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now [eventTitle] => Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, the main exhibition of the New Mexico History Museum, sweeps across more than 500 years of stories - from early Native inhabitants to today’s residents - told through artifacts, films, photographs, computer interactives, oral histories and more. Together, they breath life into the people who made the American West: Native Americans, Spanish colonists, Mexican traders, Santa Fe Trail riders, fur trappers, outlaws, railroad men, scientists, hippies and artists.

 

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, the main exhibition of the New Mexico History Museum, sweeps across more than 500 years of stories - from early Native inhabitants to today’s residents - told through artifacts, films, photographs, computer interactives, oral histories and more. Together, they breath life into the people who made the American West: Native Americans, Spanish colonists, Mexican traders, Santa Fe Trail riders, fur trappers, outlaws, railroad men, scientists, hippies and artists.

 

[5] =>

Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, the main exhibition of the New Mexico History Museum, sweeps across more than 500 years of stories - from early Native inhabitants to today’s residents - with stories told through artifacts, films, photographs, computer interactives, oral histories and more. Together, they breath life into the people who made the American West: Native Americans, Spanish colonists, Mexican traders, Santa Fe Trail riders, fur trappers, outlaws, railroad men, scientists, hippies and artists.

The exhibit is divided into six sections representing chronological periods from the pre-colonial era to the present. Each is set apart by time frames and contrasting views from first-person accounts of the people who lived during the different periods.

AREA 1    BEYOND HISTORY’S RECORDS

“We have lived upon this land from days beyond history’s records, far past any living memory, deep into the time of legend. The story of my people and the story of this place are one single story. No man can think of us without thinking of this place. We are always joined together.”

—Taos Pueblo (Tuah-Tah) elder

Visitors enter the exhibition in a curved space that mimics a cliff wall above a river. Cast-metal handprints of modern-day Native residents are triggered by your hand’s touch to play audios of how New Mexico’s longest inhabitants viewed the land around them. Pottery, baskets and jewelry from pre-European contact convey the first gallery’s main message: Native peoples have lived across present-day New Mexico for thousands of years. They have explored throughout the region and traded with other peoples across North and Central America. The American Southwest remains their home, never empty nor waiting to be discovered, neither a frontier nor a paradise.

AREA 2    THE FAR NORTHERN FRONTIER

The Spanish join the story at the beginning of the next gallery. Chasing legends of gold, the first Spanish explorers pushed into New Mexico in the early 1500s. They found much hardship but no gold, and returned to Mexico or Spain or perished on the way. At the end of the century, Juan de Oñate and his 500 followers founded a capital in northern New Mexico.

Sections within this area include:

The Spanish Mission: For the next 200 years, the Spanish struggled to establish a colony in New Mexico. Missionaries, aristocrats and settlers competed among themselves for land and power. Soldiers and settlers exploited Native American labor, imposed taxes and claimed vast tracts of land. Missionaries sought Christian converts, suppressing Native customs and religion. Spanish and Native life ways mixed and clashed. Exchange and interaction changed both cultures.

The Pueblo Revolt: In 1680, Pueblo Indians across New Mexico rose up in revolt and drove the Spanish from the territory. Spanish soldiers and settlers returned in 1693, ultimately subdued the Pueblo resistance after years of warfare, and re-established a fragile colony. Many Pueblo Indians traveled west to live with Zuni (A:shiwi) and Hopi peoples, some reconciled themselves to the Spanish presence, and some never would.

Neighbors and Strangers: For another century, Spanish and Indian peoples lived together in New Mexico and forged a rough coexistence. After signing treaties with Comanches (Nemene) and other Indians in the late 1700s, the Spanish and Pueblos of New Mexico enjoyed a decade or two of relative peace as the century ended.

AREA 3    LINKING NATIONS

In 1821, the people of Mexico threw off the rule of the Spanish king and created a new nation--the Republic of Mexico, which included present-day New Mexico. Mexicans enjoyed new freedoms to own property, earn a living, and trade. But the new nation also had growing pains. In 1846, the United States invaded and, in a two-year war, defeated the new republic.

Sections within this area include:

Mexican Independence: New Mexicans joined a new republic and grappled with a mixture of new laws and immigrants, and old frustrations.

Trials of a New Nation: In August 1837, Indian peoples and settlers in northern New Mexico began the Chimayó Rebellion. Though they professed loyalty to the republic, they protested taxes from Mexico City and the appointed governors. Gov. Albino Pérez was killed, but the rebellion was crushed.

Santa Fe Trail: The same year that Mexico won independence from Spain, a Missouri trader named William Becknell reached Santa Fe. His path came to be called the Santa Fe Trail--the first and most important of the pathways connecting New Mexico with the United States.

Trails, Traders and New Connections: The Santa Fe Trail was part of a network that opened up commerce across the Southwest. That commerce led to partnerships, settlements, marriages and friction among New Mexicans, Native Americans and Anglo-Americans.

Trappers and Mountain Men: Fur traders and mountain men—Mexican, American and French—traveled the Santa Fe Trail to New Mexico. Many remained to become farmers, ranchers, miners or distillers and began to open New Mexico to American influence.

Shifting Boundaries: Many Americans considered it the nation’s destiny to rule the continent west to the Pacific. New Mexico was caught in the middle. California was the most important goal, but the United States also hoped to pry New Mexico from the Mexican republic, by force if necessary.

The Mexican American War, or la intervención norteamericana: Gen. Stephen Watts Kearny invaded New Mexico in 1846 and installed a military government. Col. Alexander William Doniphan defeated the Mexican army at the Battle of Brazito, near El Paso.

The Taos Rebellion: Many New Mexicans deeply resented U.S. occupation. In 1847, hundreds of Native Americans and Hispanic New Mexicans led by Tomás Ortiz, or “Tomasito,” and Pablo Montoya rebelled against the U.S. territorial government and its appointed officials. Gov. Charles Bent and other officials near Taos were assassinated. U.S. troops from Santa Fe quickly crushed the rebellion, and resistance to the American invasion faded.

Manifest Destiny: New Mexico had very different destinies in the eyes of different New Mexicans. Native Americans, Hispanics and newly arrived Anglo-Americans all imagined and contested different futures for the territory.

AREA 4    BECOMING THE SOUTHWEST

With the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, Mexico lost vast territories, New Mexicans lost their country, and most of modern-day New Mexico became part of the United States. Becoming the "American Southwest" involved decades of accommodation, struggle and violence.

Sections within this exhibit include:

Indian Policy: The U.S. Army established a string of forts across New Mexico, and Native Americans responded with decades of resistance. Army leaders tried to confine Native Americans to a life of farming and raising livestock on reservations. The army forced thousands of Apaches (N’de) and Navajos (Diné) to walk hundreds of miles from their homelands to a reservation. Hundreds of Native Americans perished during this "Long Walk" and their imprisonment at Bosque Redondo near present-day Fort Sumner.

Land and Water: Who owned New Mexico’s land and water—the earth, the king, the people who cared for them, the holders of deeds? Conflicts over land and water created friction and confusion and sometimes erupted in violence, as in the Colfax County and the Lincoln County wars. New Mexico and other parts of the Southwest earned reputations for lawlessness in the late 1800s.The legend of Billy the Kid was born.

The Coming of the Railroad: By the 1880s, the railroad began to transform New Mexico. Trains brought in machinery, workers and manufactured goods—and left with ore, cattle, lumber and agricultural products. As railroads crisscrossed the state, ranching, mining, the timber industry and tourism grew up around them.

Enchantment and "Exploitation": The railroads brought more newcomers to New Mexico and spread word of the enchanting territory. People came for their health, art, the natural beauty, curiosity, scientific interest, to see Native Americans and to make money. They transformed the territory.

AREA 5    OUR PLACE IN THE NATION

New Mexico connects to the nation and the world. Conflicts and challenges—local, national and international—have profound impacts in New Mexico.

Statehood at Last: To become a state, New Mexico struggled to overcome prejudice against Hispanics and Native Americans, political corruption, its reputation for violence and Washington politics. After some 60 years as a territory, New Mexico drafted a constitution and joined the United States on January 6, 1912.

The Great Depression: The effects of the Great Depression were as complicated as New Mexico itself. Some areas suffered greatly, but new federal money poured into the state for agricultural aid and other projects. The Works Progress Administration and other government agencies helped artists, writers, photographers and many others.

World War II: Some 60,000 New Mexicans enlisted in armed forces for WWII. In the early years of the war, New Mexico suffered the highest casualty rate of any state. Displays on the Bataan Death March, Native American code talkers and Japanese internment camps show how New Mexicans were affected by World War II at home and on the battlefield.

New Mexico’s Secret: At Los Alamos, the U.S. government assembled the greatest concentration of scientific resources and brainpower in history to develop the atom bomb—and keep it a secret. The project changed New Mexico by bringing money, scientists and nuclear technology to the state. The bomb changed the world, and concerns about the atomic age began to grow.

The Post-War Booms: In the "Boom" theater, see five short documentaries on the changes New Mexico experienced post-WWII: Route 66, civil rights and land-grant struggles, hippies, continued atomic research, and the sprawling growth of our cities.

AREA 6    MY NEW MEXICO

The past lives in the present. Our memories and traditions will become New Mexico’s history. Whether cowboy, miner, immigrant or scientist, whatever your ethnic or religious background, the stories of New Mexicans today reveal unbroken connections to the past. Our work in ranching, mining, tourism, government, oil and gas, and technology; our ceremonies of celebration; our festivals of feasting and fun; our oral traditions, and our families—these are the stories that touch on all that is important in the long life of an ancient land that became our New Mexico.

Take a moment to write down a story of your own and leave it on the wall. Become part of history!

[eventFullDescription] =>

Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, the main exhibition of the New Mexico History Museum, sweeps across more than 500 years of stories - from early Native inhabitants to today’s residents - with stories told through artifacts, films, photographs, computer interactives, oral histories and more. Together, they breath life into the people who made the American West: Native Americans, Spanish colonists, Mexican traders, Santa Fe Trail riders, fur trappers, outlaws, railroad men, scientists, hippies and artists.

The exhibit is divided into six sections representing chronological periods from the pre-colonial era to the present. Each is set apart by time frames and contrasting views from first-person accounts of the people who lived during the different periods.

AREA 1    BEYOND HISTORY’S RECORDS

“We have lived upon this land from days beyond history’s records, far past any living memory, deep into the time of legend. The story of my people and the story of this place are one single story. No man can think of us without thinking of this place. We are always joined together.”

—Taos Pueblo (Tuah-Tah) elder

Visitors enter the exhibition in a curved space that mimics a cliff wall above a river. Cast-metal handprints of modern-day Native residents are triggered by your hand’s touch to play audios of how New Mexico’s longest inhabitants viewed the land around them. Pottery, baskets and jewelry from pre-European contact convey the first gallery’s main message: Native peoples have lived across present-day New Mexico for thousands of years. They have explored throughout the region and traded with other peoples across North and Central America. The American Southwest remains their home, never empty nor waiting to be discovered, neither a frontier nor a paradise.

AREA 2    THE FAR NORTHERN FRONTIER

The Spanish join the story at the beginning of the next gallery. Chasing legends of gold, the first Spanish explorers pushed into New Mexico in the early 1500s. They found much hardship but no gold, and returned to Mexico or Spain or perished on the way. At the end of the century, Juan de Oñate and his 500 followers founded a capital in northern New Mexico.

Sections within this area include:

The Spanish Mission: For the next 200 years, the Spanish struggled to establish a colony in New Mexico. Missionaries, aristocrats and settlers competed among themselves for land and power. Soldiers and settlers exploited Native American labor, imposed taxes and claimed vast tracts of land. Missionaries sought Christian converts, suppressing Native customs and religion. Spanish and Native life ways mixed and clashed. Exchange and interaction changed both cultures.

The Pueblo Revolt: In 1680, Pueblo Indians across New Mexico rose up in revolt and drove the Spanish from the territory. Spanish soldiers and settlers returned in 1693, ultimately subdued the Pueblo resistance after years of warfare, and re-established a fragile colony. Many Pueblo Indians traveled west to live with Zuni (A:shiwi) and Hopi peoples, some reconciled themselves to the Spanish presence, and some never would.

Neighbors and Strangers: For another century, Spanish and Indian peoples lived together in New Mexico and forged a rough coexistence. After signing treaties with Comanches (Nemene) and other Indians in the late 1700s, the Spanish and Pueblos of New Mexico enjoyed a decade or two of relative peace as the century ended.

AREA 3    LINKING NATIONS

In 1821, the people of Mexico threw off the rule of the Spanish king and created a new nation--the Republic of Mexico, which included present-day New Mexico. Mexicans enjoyed new freedoms to own property, earn a living, and trade. But the new nation also had growing pains. In 1846, the United States invaded and, in a two-year war, defeated the new republic.

Sections within this area include:

Mexican Independence: New Mexicans joined a new republic and grappled with a mixture of new laws and immigrants, and old frustrations.

Trials of a New Nation: In August 1837, Indian peoples and settlers in northern New Mexico began the Chimayó Rebellion. Though they professed loyalty to the republic, they protested taxes from Mexico City and the appointed governors. Gov. Albino Pérez was killed, but the rebellion was crushed.

Santa Fe Trail: The same year that Mexico won independence from Spain, a Missouri trader named William Becknell reached Santa Fe. His path came to be called the Santa Fe Trail--the first and most important of the pathways connecting New Mexico with the United States.

Trails, Traders and New Connections: The Santa Fe Trail was part of a network that opened up commerce across the Southwest. That commerce led to partnerships, settlements, marriages and friction among New Mexicans, Native Americans and Anglo-Americans.

Trappers and Mountain Men: Fur traders and mountain men—Mexican, American and French—traveled the Santa Fe Trail to New Mexico. Many remained to become farmers, ranchers, miners or distillers and began to open New Mexico to American influence.

Shifting Boundaries: Many Americans considered it the nation’s destiny to rule the continent west to the Pacific. New Mexico was caught in the middle. California was the most important goal, but the United States also hoped to pry New Mexico from the Mexican republic, by force if necessary.

The Mexican American War, or la intervención norteamericana: Gen. Stephen Watts Kearny invaded New Mexico in 1846 and installed a military government. Col. Alexander William Doniphan defeated the Mexican army at the Battle of Brazito, near El Paso.

The Taos Rebellion: Many New Mexicans deeply resented U.S. occupation. In 1847, hundreds of Native Americans and Hispanic New Mexicans led by Tomás Ortiz, or “Tomasito,” and Pablo Montoya rebelled against the U.S. territorial government and its appointed officials. Gov. Charles Bent and other officials near Taos were assassinated. U.S. troops from Santa Fe quickly crushed the rebellion, and resistance to the American invasion faded.

Manifest Destiny: New Mexico had very different destinies in the eyes of different New Mexicans. Native Americans, Hispanics and newly arrived Anglo-Americans all imagined and contested different futures for the territory.

AREA 4    BECOMING THE SOUTHWEST

With the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, Mexico lost vast territories, New Mexicans lost their country, and most of modern-day New Mexico became part of the United States. Becoming the "American Southwest" involved decades of accommodation, struggle and violence.

Sections within this exhibit include:

Indian Policy: The U.S. Army established a string of forts across New Mexico, and Native Americans responded with decades of resistance. Army leaders tried to confine Native Americans to a life of farming and raising livestock on reservations. The army forced thousands of Apaches (N’de) and Navajos (Diné) to walk hundreds of miles from their homelands to a reservation. Hundreds of Native Americans perished during this "Long Walk" and their imprisonment at Bosque Redondo near present-day Fort Sumner.

Land and Water: Who owned New Mexico’s land and water—the earth, the king, the people who cared for them, the holders of deeds? Conflicts over land and water created friction and confusion and sometimes erupted in violence, as in the Colfax County and the Lincoln County wars. New Mexico and other parts of the Southwest earned reputations for lawlessness in the late 1800s.The legend of Billy the Kid was born.

The Coming of the Railroad: By the 1880s, the railroad began to transform New Mexico. Trains brought in machinery, workers and manufactured goods—and left with ore, cattle, lumber and agricultural products. As railroads crisscrossed the state, ranching, mining, the timber industry and tourism grew up around them.

Enchantment and "Exploitation": The railroads brought more newcomers to New Mexico and spread word of the enchanting territory. People came for their health, art, the natural beauty, curiosity, scientific interest, to see Native Americans and to make money. They transformed the territory.

AREA 5    OUR PLACE IN THE NATION

New Mexico connects to the nation and the world. Conflicts and challenges—local, national and international—have profound impacts in New Mexico.

Statehood at Last: To become a state, New Mexico struggled to overcome prejudice against Hispanics and Native Americans, political corruption, its reputation for violence and Washington politics. After some 60 years as a territory, New Mexico drafted a constitution and joined the United States on January 6, 1912.

The Great Depression: The effects of the Great Depression were as complicated as New Mexico itself. Some areas suffered greatly, but new federal money poured into the state for agricultural aid and other projects. The Works Progress Administration and other government agencies helped artists, writers, photographers and many others.

World War II: Some 60,000 New Mexicans enlisted in armed forces for WWII. In the early years of the war, New Mexico suffered the highest casualty rate of any state. Displays on the Bataan Death March, Native American code talkers and Japanese internment camps show how New Mexicans were affected by World War II at home and on the battlefield.

New Mexico’s Secret: At Los Alamos, the U.S. government assembled the greatest concentration of scientific resources and brainpower in history to develop the atom bomb—and keep it a secret. The project changed New Mexico by bringing money, scientists and nuclear technology to the state. The bomb changed the world, and concerns about the atomic age began to grow.

The Post-War Booms: In the "Boom" theater, see five short documentaries on the changes New Mexico experienced post-WWII: Route 66, civil rights and land-grant struggles, hippies, continued atomic research, and the sprawling growth of our cities.

AREA 6    MY NEW MEXICO

The past lives in the present. Our memories and traditions will become New Mexico’s history. Whether cowboy, miner, immigrant or scientist, whatever your ethnic or religious background, the stories of New Mexicans today reveal unbroken connections to the past. Our work in ranching, mining, tourism, government, oil and gas, and technology; our ceremonies of celebration; our festivals of feasting and fun; our oral traditions, and our families—these are the stories that touch on all that is important in the long life of an ancient land that became our New Mexico.

Take a moment to write down a story of your own and leave it on the wall. Become part of history!

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Now 400 years old, Santa Fe was once an infant city on the remote frontier.  Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time, on long-term exhibit in the Palace of the Governors, explores the archaeological evidence and historical documentation of the City Different before the Spanish arrived, as well as at the settling of the first colony in San Gabriel del Yungue, the founding of Santa Fe and its first 100 years as New Mexico’s first capital.

Co-curated by Josef Diaz of the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors and Stephen Post of the DCA/Office of Archaeological Studies, Santa Fe Found collects more than 160 artifacts from four historic sites, along with maps, documents, household goods, weaponry and religious objects. Together, they tell the story of cultural encounters between early colonists and the Native Americans who had long called this place home.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Now 400 years old, Santa Fe was once an infant city on the remote frontier.  Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time, on long-term exhibit in the Palace of the Governors, explores the archaeological evidence and historical documentation of the City Different before the Spanish arrived, as well as at the settling of the first colony in San Gabriel del Yungue, the founding of Santa Fe and its first 100 years as New Mexico’s first capital.

Co-curated by Josef Diaz of the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors and Stephen Post of the DCA/Office of Archaeological Studies, Santa Fe Found collects more than 160 artifacts from four historic sites, along with maps, documents, household goods, weaponry and religious objects. Together, they tell the story of cultural encounters between early colonists and the Native Americans who had long called this place home.

[5] =>

Now 400 years old, Santa Fe was once an infant city on the remote frontier.  Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time, on long-term exhibit in the Palace of the Governors, explores the archaeological evidence and historical documentation of the City Different before the Spanish arrived, as well as at the settling of the first colony in San Gabriel del Yungue, the founding of Santa Fe and its first 100 years as New Mexico’s first capital.

Co-curated by Josef Diaz of the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors and Stephen Post of the DCA/Office of Archaeological Studies, Santa Fe Found collects more than 160 artifacts from four historic sites, along with maps, documents, household goods, weaponry and religious objects. Together, they tell the story of cultural encounters between early colonists and the Native Americans who had long called this place home.

“This exhibition gives visitors a broad perspective of the settling of Santa Fe and the web of cultural influences the Spanish brought with them,” Diaz said. “The founding of Santa Fe is a big and complex story to tell, and this show offers a glimpse of different aspects of Spanish colonial life, from the domestic to the economic to the political and religious.”

Santa Fe Found serves as living proof of how the lives of the founders were lived, including who they married, the hardships they faced, the tools they used and the foods they ate. (Hint: Carne Adovada was generations away; turkey, deer and rabbit were often the dish of the day.)

Prior to the construction of the New Mexico History Museum, which opened in May 2009, Post and his fellow archaeologists conducted a two-year dig to investigate the archaeology of the site at 113 Lincoln Ave., just off the Santa Fe Plaza. More than 90,000 artifacts were unearthed from the 17th-century, revealing tales of life as it once was.

“Surprising to some and not to others, the New Mexico History Museum was complex and rich in the information it yielded on 300 years of people living and working behind the Palace of the Governors,” Post said. “Combined with Dedie Snow’s 1974-1975 excavations within the Palace, our work gives a unique inside-outside look at a central place in New Mexico history.”

Other featured archaeological sites add to the story. The Baca-Garvisu site was the home of a prominent Santa Fe family in the 1700s, located where the Santa Fe Community Convention Center now stands. The Sanchez Site, an early Spanish estancia, or rural settlement, was partly excavated in the 1980s and is now managed by El Rancho de los Golondrinas. Also prominent in the exhibition is San Gabriel del Yungue at the Pueblo of Ohkay Owingeh, where the first Spanish colonists briefly set their roots.

Spain’s far northern colony of Santa Fe was reached by a six-month journey up El Camino Real, a barely mapped and uncertain route that held only hazy promises of water and shelter. Holding together a caravan of 700 people – soldiers, friars, men and a few women and children – and the tools and livestock it would take to build a new colony tested the explorers’ abilities and, sometimes, their humanity.

Some of the artifacts show that, despite the frontier conditions, fine goods had managed to travel up El Camino Real to homes and missions in the colony. A sampling of the pottery that was found on the digs includes Spanish majolica, blue-and-white Mexican pottery modeled on examples from the Ming Dynasty in China, colorful Mexican pottery and Pueblo pottery. Also found were tobacco pipes, gold earrings, gunflints and arrowheads.

A few sherds of the pottery found by archaeologists speak to a monumental expedition. Centuries past, they were parts of delicate Ming vases loaded onto a Spanish galleon at a Chinese port for an ocean journey then a bumpy trip up El Camino Real to the young colony.

“Considering the Chinese pottery traveled across the ocean and then 1,600 miles up the Camino Real, it’s not surprising – and it’s even amazing – that we found only one or two pieces of these vessels,” Post said.

From these roots grew La Villa Real de Santa Fe, the Royal City of Santa Fe. What do the historical accounts say of the homes they built and the crops they grew? What has the soil yielded of their lives, the fragile beginnings of a young Spanish colony?

Come to the exhibit to find out.

Funding for the Santa Fe Found exhibition and lecture series was made possible by the Palace Guard, a support group of the Museum of New Mexico Foundation; the Gala Opening Committee; Friends of Archaeology, a support group of the Museum of New Mexico Foundation; the Santa Fe 400th; and the Museum of New Mexico Foundation.

 

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

Now 400 years old, Santa Fe was once an infant city on the remote frontier.  Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time, on long-term exhibit in the Palace of the Governors, explores the archaeological evidence and historical documentation of the City Different before the Spanish arrived, as well as at the settling of the first colony in San Gabriel del Yungue, the founding of Santa Fe and its first 100 years as New Mexico’s first capital.

Co-curated by Josef Diaz of the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors and Stephen Post of the DCA/Office of Archaeological Studies, Santa Fe Found collects more than 160 artifacts from four historic sites, along with maps, documents, household goods, weaponry and religious objects. Together, they tell the story of cultural encounters between early colonists and the Native Americans who had long called this place home.

“This exhibition gives visitors a broad perspective of the settling of Santa Fe and the web of cultural influences the Spanish brought with them,” Diaz said. “The founding of Santa Fe is a big and complex story to tell, and this show offers a glimpse of different aspects of Spanish colonial life, from the domestic to the economic to the political and religious.”

Santa Fe Found serves as living proof of how the lives of the founders were lived, including who they married, the hardships they faced, the tools they used and the foods they ate. (Hint: Carne Adovada was generations away; turkey, deer and rabbit were often the dish of the day.)

Prior to the construction of the New Mexico History Museum, which opened in May 2009, Post and his fellow archaeologists conducted a two-year dig to investigate the archaeology of the site at 113 Lincoln Ave., just off the Santa Fe Plaza. More than 90,000 artifacts were unearthed from the 17th-century, revealing tales of life as it once was.

“Surprising to some and not to others, the New Mexico History Museum was complex and rich in the information it yielded on 300 years of people living and working behind the Palace of the Governors,” Post said. “Combined with Dedie Snow’s 1974-1975 excavations within the Palace, our work gives a unique inside-outside look at a central place in New Mexico history.”

Other featured archaeological sites add to the story. The Baca-Garvisu site was the home of a prominent Santa Fe family in the 1700s, located where the Santa Fe Community Convention Center now stands. The Sanchez Site, an early Spanish estancia, or rural settlement, was partly excavated in the 1980s and is now managed by El Rancho de los Golondrinas. Also prominent in the exhibition is San Gabriel del Yungue at the Pueblo of Ohkay Owingeh, where the first Spanish colonists briefly set their roots.

Spain’s far northern colony of Santa Fe was reached by a six-month journey up El Camino Real, a barely mapped and uncertain route that held only hazy promises of water and shelter. Holding together a caravan of 700 people – soldiers, friars, men and a few women and children – and the tools and livestock it would take to build a new colony tested the explorers’ abilities and, sometimes, their humanity.

Some of the artifacts show that, despite the frontier conditions, fine goods had managed to travel up El Camino Real to homes and missions in the colony. A sampling of the pottery that was found on the digs includes Spanish majolica, blue-and-white Mexican pottery modeled on examples from the Ming Dynasty in China, colorful Mexican pottery and Pueblo pottery. Also found were tobacco pipes, gold earrings, gunflints and arrowheads.

A few sherds of the pottery found by archaeologists speak to a monumental expedition. Centuries past, they were parts of delicate Ming vases loaded onto a Spanish galleon at a Chinese port for an ocean journey then a bumpy trip up El Camino Real to the young colony.

“Considering the Chinese pottery traveled across the ocean and then 1,600 miles up the Camino Real, it’s not surprising – and it’s even amazing – that we found only one or two pieces of these vessels,” Post said.

From these roots grew La Villa Real de Santa Fe, the Royal City of Santa Fe. What do the historical accounts say of the homes they built and the crops they grew? What has the soil yielded of their lives, the fragile beginnings of a young Spanish colony?

Come to the exhibit to find out.

Funding for the Santa Fe Found exhibition and lecture series was made possible by the Palace Guard, a support group of the Museum of New Mexico Foundation; the Gala Opening Committee; Friends of Archaeology, a support group of the Museum of New Mexico Foundation; the Santa Fe 400th; and the Museum of New Mexico Foundation.

 

 

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Multiple Visions: A Common Bond has been the destination for well over a million first-time and repeat visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art. First, second, third, or countless times around, we find our gaze drawn by different objects, different scenes. With more than 10,000 objects to see, this exhibition continues to enchant museum visitors, staff and patrons.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Multiple Visions: A Common Bond has been the destination for well over a million first-time and repeat visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art. First, second, third, or countless times around, we find our gaze drawn by different objects, different scenes. With more than 10,000 objects to see, this exhibition continues to enchant museum visitors, staff and patrons.

[5] =>

The Girard Collection: Enduring Appeal It is entirely possible to be both delighted and overwhelmed by the Alexander Girard’s one-of-a-kind exhibition—even after more than twenty-five years. The vastness of the exhibit space, the complexity of the design, the sheer quantity of objects on display—the immensity and intensity can be overpowering. And compelling.That’s why Multiple Visions: A Common Bond has been the destination for well over a million first-time and repeat visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art. First, second, third, or countless times around, we find our gaze drawn by different objects, different scenes. With more than 10,000 objects to see, this exhibition continues to enchant museum visitors, staff and patrons.

With his singular vision and intuitive understanding of the multiplicity of cultures and artistic genres, perhaps Girard himself felt the same unflagging delight when he was designing the exhibit. Girard rewards those who look carefully with touches of wit and whimsy, amazing us with his command of detail and sense of perspective. He appeals to children and adults alike who peer into the sets from different angles, to glimpse people and animals, puppets, dolls, and small figures of clay, wood, paper, cloth, and, yes, even plastics. Some look familiar, clearly identifiable as the products of specific cultures and places. Others take us to places we can only imagine. Who can ever tire of going back to these places of enjoyment and creativity?

The Girard Family collection of more than 100,000 objects is unique in part because of its size and breadth: more than 100 countries on six continents are represented. Enjoy this text-free gallery with or without a docent, pick up a Gallery Guide to read more about the cases, or pick up a multi-media tour on an Ipod touch available at the front desk for no additional fee.

"I believe we should preserve this evidence of the past, not as a pattern for sentimental imitation, but as nourishment for the creative spirit of the present."

- Alexander Girard

 

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

The Girard Collection: Enduring Appeal It is entirely possible to be both delighted and overwhelmed by the Alexander Girard’s one-of-a-kind exhibition—even after more than twenty-five years. The vastness of the exhibit space, the complexity of the design, the sheer quantity of objects on display—the immensity and intensity can be overpowering. And compelling.That’s why Multiple Visions: A Common Bond has been the destination for well over a million first-time and repeat visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art. First, second, third, or countless times around, we find our gaze drawn by different objects, different scenes. With more than 10,000 objects to see, this exhibition continues to enchant museum visitors, staff and patrons.

With his singular vision and intuitive understanding of the multiplicity of cultures and artistic genres, perhaps Girard himself felt the same unflagging delight when he was designing the exhibit. Girard rewards those who look carefully with touches of wit and whimsy, amazing us with his command of detail and sense of perspective. He appeals to children and adults alike who peer into the sets from different angles, to glimpse people and animals, puppets, dolls, and small figures of clay, wood, paper, cloth, and, yes, even plastics. Some look familiar, clearly identifiable as the products of specific cultures and places. Others take us to places we can only imagine. Who can ever tire of going back to these places of enjoyment and creativity?

The Girard Family collection of more than 100,000 objects is unique in part because of its size and breadth: more than 100 countries on six continents are represented. Enjoy this text-free gallery with or without a docent, pick up a Gallery Guide to read more about the cases, or pick up a multi-media tour on an Ipod touch available at the front desk for no additional fee.

"I believe we should preserve this evidence of the past, not as a pattern for sentimental imitation, but as nourishment for the creative spirit of the present."

- Alexander Girard

 

 

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Will Rogers noted that Fred Harvey “kept the West in food—and wives.” But the company’s Harvey Girls are by no means its only legacy. From the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s 1879 arrival in New Mexico to the 1970 demolition of Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel, the Fred Harvey name and its company’s influence have been felt across New Mexico, not to mention the American West. The company and its New Mexico establishments served as the stage on which people such as Mary Colter were able to fashion an “authentic” tourist experience, along with Herman Schweizer who helped drive the direction of Native American jewelry and crafts as an industry.

Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy, a new section that joins the New Mexico History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, helps tell those stories. Opening December 7, Setting the Standard uses artifacts from the museum’s collection, images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and loans from other museums and private collectors. Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the tale will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Will Rogers noted that Fred Harvey “kept the West in food—and wives.” But the company’s Harvey Girls are by no means its only legacy. From the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s 1879 arrival in New Mexico to the 1970 demolition of Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel, the Fred Harvey name and its company’s influence have been felt across New Mexico, not to mention the American West. The company and its New Mexico establishments served as the stage on which people such as Mary Colter were able to fashion an “authentic” tourist experience, along with Herman Schweizer who helped drive the direction of Native American jewelry and crafts as an industry.

Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy, a new section that joins the New Mexico History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, helps tell those stories. Opening December 7, Setting the Standard uses artifacts from the museum’s collection, images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and loans from other museums and private collectors. Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the tale will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.

[5] =>

Will Rogers noted that Fred Harvey “kept the West in food—and wives.” But the company’s Harvey Girls are by no means its only legacy. From the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s 1879 arrival in New Mexico to the 1970 demolition of Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel, the Fred Harvey name and its company’s influence have been felt across New Mexico, not to mention the American West. The company and its New Mexico establishments served as the stage on which people such as Mary Colter were able to fashion an “authentic” tourist experience, along with Herman Schweizer who helped drive the direction of Native American jewelry and crafts as an industry.

Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy, a new section that joins the New Mexico History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, helps tell those stories. Opening December 7, Setting the Standard uses artifacts from the museum’s collection, images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and loans from other museums and private collectors. Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the tale will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.

“People don’t always realize that many of the turning points in the company’s history are specific to New Mexico,” said Meredith Davidson, curator of 19th- and 20th-century Southwest collections. “The Harvey Girls were invented in Raton. Native American jewelry, pottery, blankets and other goods were shaped by sales at the Alvarado’s Indian Room in Albuquerque. Tourists experienced `the authentic Southwest’ through Indian Detours that left from Santa Fe’s La Fonda Hotel and countless others.

“In many ways, Fred Harvey and the AT&SF Railway grew up together in New Mexico. As tracks were laid through cities, a Harvey House appeared. From small eating houses in cities like Deming, to large hotels like the Alvarado, each place left an imprint on the local community as well as on the tourists who returned to their homes with tales of that Fred Harvey experience.”

Artifacts in the exhibit include: the original Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway track sign for Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel; Harvey Girl uniforms (including the unique embroidered blouse worn by La Fonda waitresses in the 1950s); furniture designed by famed architect and interior decorator Mary Colter; hand-stamped Navajo spoons; Fred Harvey’s original datebook and an iconic painting of the man behind the empire. Other artifacts include a gong similar to ones that rang travelers to their meals (this one hung in the company’s Chicago office) and an original Doris Lee painting while helping to plan MGM’s The Harvey Girls, starring Judy Garland. The image Lee created was adopted by the Harvey Company and used on menus at El Navajo in Gallup and El Tovar at the Grand Canyon.

In addition, an interactive station will feature excerpts of Harvey Girl interviews conducted by Katrina Parks for her 2013 documentary, The Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound.

Opening events, Sunday, December 7, 2014:

10 am, 11 am, noon and 4 pm, see The Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound, a 57-minute documentary, in the museum auditorium

2 pm, gather in the auditorium for a conversation with curator Meredith Davidson, documentary producer Katrina Parks, and Stephen Fried, author of the acclaimed biography Appetite for America

3 pm, refreshments in the lobby

Free with admission; Sundays free to NM residents; children 16 and under free daily

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

Will Rogers noted that Fred Harvey “kept the West in food—and wives.” But the company’s Harvey Girls are by no means its only legacy. From the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s 1879 arrival in New Mexico to the 1970 demolition of Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel, the Fred Harvey name and its company’s influence have been felt across New Mexico, not to mention the American West. The company and its New Mexico establishments served as the stage on which people such as Mary Colter were able to fashion an “authentic” tourist experience, along with Herman Schweizer who helped drive the direction of Native American jewelry and crafts as an industry.

Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy, a new section that joins the New Mexico History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, helps tell those stories. Opening December 7, Setting the Standard uses artifacts from the museum’s collection, images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and loans from other museums and private collectors. Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the tale will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.

“People don’t always realize that many of the turning points in the company’s history are specific to New Mexico,” said Meredith Davidson, curator of 19th- and 20th-century Southwest collections. “The Harvey Girls were invented in Raton. Native American jewelry, pottery, blankets and other goods were shaped by sales at the Alvarado’s Indian Room in Albuquerque. Tourists experienced `the authentic Southwest’ through Indian Detours that left from Santa Fe’s La Fonda Hotel and countless others.

“In many ways, Fred Harvey and the AT&SF Railway grew up together in New Mexico. As tracks were laid through cities, a Harvey House appeared. From small eating houses in cities like Deming, to large hotels like the Alvarado, each place left an imprint on the local community as well as on the tourists who returned to their homes with tales of that Fred Harvey experience.”

Artifacts in the exhibit include: the original Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway track sign for Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel; Harvey Girl uniforms (including the unique embroidered blouse worn by La Fonda waitresses in the 1950s); furniture designed by famed architect and interior decorator Mary Colter; hand-stamped Navajo spoons; Fred Harvey’s original datebook and an iconic painting of the man behind the empire. Other artifacts include a gong similar to ones that rang travelers to their meals (this one hung in the company’s Chicago office) and an original Doris Lee painting while helping to plan MGM’s The Harvey Girls, starring Judy Garland. The image Lee created was adopted by the Harvey Company and used on menus at El Navajo in Gallup and El Tovar at the Grand Canyon.

In addition, an interactive station will feature excerpts of Harvey Girl interviews conducted by Katrina Parks for her 2013 documentary, The Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound.

Opening events, Sunday, December 7, 2014:

10 am, 11 am, noon and 4 pm, see The Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound, a 57-minute documentary, in the museum auditorium

2 pm, gather in the auditorium for a conversation with curator Meredith Davidson, documentary producer Katrina Parks, and Stephen Fried, author of the acclaimed biography Appetite for America

3 pm, refreshments in the lobby

Free with admission; Sundays free to NM residents; children 16 and under free daily

 

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Sponge Bob Square Pants, Pac Man, and Curious George, all sporting a particularly Native American twist, are just a few images from popular mainstream culture seen in the exhibition, Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art.

The free to the public opening for Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture is on July 17, 2016 from 1 to 4 pm and the show runs through October 22, 2017.

Featuring nearly 100 objects by more than fifty artists from the museum’s collections as well as others borrowed from collectors and artists, the work on view in Into the Future will be in such various media as traditional clothing and jewelry, pottery and weaving, photography and video, through to comics, and on into cyberspace.

 

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Sponge Bob Square Pants, Pac Man, and Curious George, all sporting a particularly Native American twist, are just a few images from popular mainstream culture seen in the exhibition, Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art.

The free to the public opening for Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture is on July 17, 2016 from 1 to 4 pm and the show runs through October 22, 2017.

Featuring nearly 100 objects by more than fifty artists from the museum’s collections as well as others borrowed from collectors and artists, the work on view in Into the Future will be in such various media as traditional clothing and jewelry, pottery and weaving, photography and video, through to comics, and on into cyberspace.

 

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From the 1880s into the early 20th century, cigar manufacturers provided an avenue for the lithographic arts to flourish. Layering up to 10 colors in a stone-lithography process and even adding gold embellishments and stamped embossings, the images sold cigars through romantic landscapes, Western adventures, and hot-blooded señoritas. In Out of the Box: The Art of the Cigar, opening Oct. 7, 2016 (precise closing date to be determined), Palace Press Curator Thomas Leech shares primo examples to showcase the rich breadth of artwork created during the golden age of cigar box labels.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

From the 1880s into the early 20th century, cigar manufacturers provided an avenue for the lithographic arts to flourish. Layering up to 10 colors in a stone-lithography process and even adding gold embellishments and stamped embossings, the images sold cigars through romantic landscapes, Western adventures, and hot-blooded señoritas. In Out of the Box: The Art of the Cigar, opening Oct. 7, 2016 (precise closing date to be determined), Palace Press Curator Thomas Leech shares primo examples to showcase the rich breadth of artwork created during the golden age of cigar box labels.

[5] =>

From the 1880s into the early 20th century, cigar manufacturers provided an avenue for the lithographic arts to flourish. Layering up to 10 colors in a stone-lithography process and even adding gold embellishments and stamped embossings, the images sold cigars through romantic landscapes, Western adventures, and hot-blooded señoritas.

Historian Loy Glenn Westfall recently donated a portion of his collection of lusciously printed cigar box labels (possibly the world’s largest collection) to the New Mexico History Museum. In Out of the Box: The Art of the Cigar, opening Oct. 7, 2016 (precise closing date to be determined), Palace Press Curator Thomas Leech shares primo examples to showcase the rich breadth of artwork created during the golden age of cigar box labels.

“Western imagery portrayed in this collection includes the brands Nue Mexico, Santa Fe, Flora Fina (Annie Oakley), Tom Mix and Chas. M Russell,” Leech said. “The themes run from Western Americana to printing technology, advertising, popular culture, and Cuban-American relations, past and present.”

The exhibit includes a 19th-century lithography press and an explanation of the lithographic process.

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

From the 1880s into the early 20th century, cigar manufacturers provided an avenue for the lithographic arts to flourish. Layering up to 10 colors in a stone-lithography process and even adding gold embellishments and stamped embossings, the images sold cigars through romantic landscapes, Western adventures, and hot-blooded señoritas.

Historian Loy Glenn Westfall recently donated a portion of his collection of lusciously printed cigar box labels (possibly the world’s largest collection) to the New Mexico History Museum. In Out of the Box: The Art of the Cigar, opening Oct. 7, 2016 (precise closing date to be determined), Palace Press Curator Thomas Leech shares primo examples to showcase the rich breadth of artwork created during the golden age of cigar box labels.

“Western imagery portrayed in this collection includes the brands Nue Mexico, Santa Fe, Flora Fina (Annie Oakley), Tom Mix and Chas. M Russell,” Leech said. “The themes run from Western Americana to printing technology, advertising, popular culture, and Cuban-American relations, past and present.”

The exhibit includes a 19th-century lithography press and an explanation of the lithographic process.

 

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The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked like.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked like.

[5] =>

The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked like.

Walk through the home and see period artifacts and get a feel for colonial New Mexico. Most houses of the period followed a design typical of the regions surrounding the Mediterranean Sea (Southern Europe, the Middle East and North Africa), with single rooms built end-to-end around a central courtyard (placita). Doors and windows from each room opened onto the placita. The artifacts and features of the New Mexico colonial home are based on archaeological information from excavations, wills, and inventories from the late 1700s to 1800s.

The New Mexico Colonial Home is on long-term display.

[eventFullDescription] =>

The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked like.

Walk through the home and see period artifacts and get a feel for colonial New Mexico. Most houses of the period followed a design typical of the regions surrounding the Mediterranean Sea (Southern Europe, the Middle East and North Africa), with single rooms built end-to-end around a central courtyard (placita). Doors and windows from each room opened onto the placita. The artifacts and features of the New Mexico colonial home are based on archaeological information from excavations, wills, and inventories from the late 1700s to 1800s.

The New Mexico Colonial Home is on long-term display.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3406_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3406_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-01-01 [eventStartDate] => 2017-01-01 [9] => 2030-01-01 [eventEndDate] => 2030-01-01 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 28 [instID] => 28 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-08-22 10:31:15 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-22 10:31:15 [17] => 3406_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3406_1200.jpg [18] => 28 [19] => New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum [instName] => New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum [20] => 28.jpg [instFileName] => 28.jpg [urlSlug] => new-mexico-colonial-home-circa-1815 ) [11] => Array ( [0] => 3407 [eventID] => 3407 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Icons of Exploration [eventTitle] => Icons of Exploration [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Showcases some of the Museum’s most celebrated objects including a real "moon rock," rare replicas of the first man-made satellites, Sputnik and Explorer, and the Gargoyle, an early guided missile.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Showcases some of the Museum’s most celebrated objects including a real "moon rock," rare replicas of the first man-made satellites, Sputnik and Explorer, and the Gargoyle, an early guided missile.

[5] =>

Icons of Exploration, a permanent exhibition at the New Mexico Museum of Space History, showcases some of the Museum’s most celebrated objects including a real "moon rock," rare replicas of the first man-made satellites, Sputnik and Explorer, and the Gargoyle, an early guided missile.

Throughout the exhibition, visitors are introduced to themes and subjects that are revisited and developed in other areas of the museum.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Icons of Exploration, a permanent exhibition at the New Mexico Museum of Space History, showcases some of the Museum’s most celebrated objects including a real "moon rock," rare replicas of the first man-made satellites, Sputnik and Explorer, and the Gargoyle, an early guided missile.

Throughout the exhibition, visitors are introduced to themes and subjects that are revisited and developed in other areas of the museum.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3407_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3407_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-01-01 [eventStartDate] => 2017-01-01 [9] => 2030-01-01 [eventEndDate] => 2030-01-01 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 40 [instID] => 40 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-08-22 10:16:58 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-22 10:16:58 [17] => 3407_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3407_1200.jpg [18] => 40 [19] => New Mexico Museum of Space History [instName] => New Mexico Museum of Space History [20] => 40.jpg [instFileName] => 40.jpg [urlSlug] => icons-of-exploration ) [12] => Array ( [0] => 3408 [eventID] => 3408 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => The Cowboy Way: Drawings by Robert ’Shoofly’ Shufelt [eventTitle] => The Cowboy Way: Drawings by Robert ’Shoofly’ Shufelt [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

The first artwork ever to be displayed at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum belonged to Robert “Shoofly” Shufelt. Fifteen years after he graciously loaned some of his lithographs for a temporary exhibit, Shufelt and his wife, Julie, donated his collection to the museum for a long-term exhibition.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

The first artwork ever to be displayed at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum belonged to Robert “Shoofly” Shufelt. Fifteen years after he graciously loaned some of his lithographs for a temporary exhibit, Shufelt and his wife, Julie, donated his collection to the museum for a long-term exhibition.

[5] =>

The first artwork ever to be displayed at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum belonged to Robert “Shoofly” Shufelt. Fifteen years after he graciously loaned some of his lithographs for a temporary exhibit, Shufelt and his wife, Julie, donated his collection to the museum for a long-term exhibition.

“Robert Shufelt is world-renowned,” said Museum Chief Curator Toni Laumbach. “He is among the best in the field of fine art that depicts the cowboy and daily ranch life.” Shoofly’s respect for ranching as a way of life is clearly stated in his art. He has raised horses and cattle, and his art portrays a story of hard work and relationships with animals.

Shufelt, who says being an artist “is a compulsion, not a decision,” is a master of the pencil. He brings to life dramatic imagery with bold sunlight and shadow. Each original drawing is astonishing with complexity of composition and disciplined draftsmanship. The prints are done in runs of 300 or less.

[eventFullDescription] =>

The first artwork ever to be displayed at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum belonged to Robert “Shoofly” Shufelt. Fifteen years after he graciously loaned some of his lithographs for a temporary exhibit, Shufelt and his wife, Julie, donated his collection to the museum for a long-term exhibition.

“Robert Shufelt is world-renowned,” said Museum Chief Curator Toni Laumbach. “He is among the best in the field of fine art that depicts the cowboy and daily ranch life.” Shoofly’s respect for ranching as a way of life is clearly stated in his art. He has raised horses and cattle, and his art portrays a story of hard work and relationships with animals.

Shufelt, who says being an artist “is a compulsion, not a decision,” is a master of the pencil. He brings to life dramatic imagery with bold sunlight and shadow. Each original drawing is astonishing with complexity of composition and disciplined draftsmanship. The prints are done in runs of 300 or less.

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Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankinds exploration of space.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankinds exploration of space.

[5] =>

Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankind’s exploration of space.

Examples of exhibits include the Sonic Wind I rocket sled ridden by Dr. Stapp and the Little Joe II rocket which tested the Apollo Launch Escape System.

At 86 feet tall, Little Joe II is the largest rocket ever launched from New Mexico.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankind’s exploration of space.

Examples of exhibits include the Sonic Wind I rocket sled ridden by Dr. Stapp and the Little Joe II rocket which tested the Apollo Launch Escape System.

At 86 feet tall, Little Joe II is the largest rocket ever launched from New Mexico.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3409_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3409_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-01-01 [eventStartDate] => 2017-01-01 [9] => 2030-01-01 [eventEndDate] => 2030-01-01 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 40 [instID] => 40 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-08-22 10:53:47 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-22 10:53:47 [17] => 3409_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3409_1200.jpg [18] => 40 [19] => New Mexico Museum of Space History [instName] => New Mexico Museum of Space History [20] => 40.jpg [instFileName] => 40.jpg [urlSlug] => john-p-stapp-air-space-park ) [14] => Array ( [0] => 3410 [eventID] => 3410 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Generations [eventTitle] => Generations [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

The Museum’s first permanent exhibit takes visitors on an odyssey through 150 generations over 4,000 years of agriculture in New Mexico. 

[eventBriefDescription] =>

The Museum’s first permanent exhibit takes visitors on an odyssey through 150 generations over 4,000 years of agriculture in New Mexico. 

[5] =>

The Museum’s first permanent exhibit takes visitors on an odyssey through 150 generations over 4,000 years of agriculture in New Mexico.

The exhibit uses the biographies of 33 people from New Mexico’s history – some famous, some not famous – to tell the story. It features ancient tools, a replica of a Mogollon pithouse, audio interviews and hands-on activities.

Generations is on long-term display in the Main Exhibitions Gallery.

[eventFullDescription] =>

The Museum’s first permanent exhibit takes visitors on an odyssey through 150 generations over 4,000 years of agriculture in New Mexico.

The exhibit uses the biographies of 33 people from New Mexico’s history – some famous, some not famous – to tell the story. It features ancient tools, a replica of a Mogollon pithouse, audio interviews and hands-on activities.

Generations is on long-term display in the Main Exhibitions Gallery.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3410_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3410_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-01-01 [eventStartDate] => 2017-01-01 [9] => 2030-01-01 [eventEndDate] => 2030-01-01 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 28 [instID] => 28 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-08-22 11:39:25 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-22 11:39:25 [17] => 3410_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3410_1200.jpg [18] => 28 [19] => New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum [instName] => New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum [20] => 28.jpg [instFileName] => 28.jpg [urlSlug] => generations ) [15] => Array ( [0] => 3047 [eventID] => 3047 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Lloyd’s Treasure Chest [eventTitle] => Lloyd’s Treasure Chest [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Folk Art is a treasure, and Lloyd’s Treasure Chest offers a participatory gallery experience highlighting the Museum’s permanent collection of over 136,000 objects of international folk art from over 100 countries, representing thousands of unique cultures. Because the entire collection can never be on view at the same time, collections are carefully stored and cared for in rooms such as our Neutrogena Vault, which visitors can view from the Treasure Chest gallery.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Folk Art is a treasure, and Lloyd’s Treasure Chest offers a participatory gallery experience highlighting the Museum’s permanent collection of over 136,000 objects of international folk art from over 100 countries, representing thousands of unique cultures. Because the entire collection can never be on view at the same time, collections are carefully stored and cared for in rooms such as our Neutrogena Vault, which visitors can view from the Treasure Chest gallery.

[5] =>

Folk Art is a treasure, and Lloyd’s Treasure Chest offers a participatory gallery experience highlighting the Museum’s permanent collection of over 136,000 objects of international folk art from over 100 countries, representing thousands of unique cultures. Because the entire collection can never be on view at the same time, collections are carefully stored and cared for in rooms such as our Neutrogena Vault, which visitors can view from the Treasure Chest gallery.

Visitors are invited to think about folk art. In fact, there is no one definition of folk art. In collecting and displaying folk art, the museum considers various concepts: Folk art is traditional art, reflecting shared cultural aesthetics, community values, priorities, and social issues. Folk art may change over time and include innovations in traditions. Folk art is handmade, although it may include new, synthetic, or recycled components. Folk art may constitute income and empowerment for an individual, a family, or a community. Folk art may be art of the everyday or reserved for special occasions. Folk art may be learned formally or informally, from family or other artists. Folk art may be intangible, including various forms of expressive culture like dance, song, poetry, and food ways. Folk art is of, by, and for the people. We mean all people, inclusive of class, culture, community, ethnicity, and religion. Together, we can consider the multitude of perspectives and come closer to understanding “What is Folk Art?”

Rotating thematic displays will offer close-up views of the museum’s folk art collection. In collaboration with the New Mexico History Museum’s exhibition Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat, opening June 23  a display of Syrian folk art opens June 4, 2017. Hands on activities appropriate for ages 3 to 103 in the gallery include: coloring activities, origami and a Javanese musical instrument.  The cultural context of folk art can be explored with a map, book area. The notion that Folk Art may be intangible is explored with a musical instrument: a gender, a gamelan instrument The re-opening brings back some old favorites from past exhibitions, including “Last of the Red Hot Lovers”, an American sculpture made from recycled metal by artist Dwight Martinek (aka “Wild Willie”), “The Followers of Ghandi” by renowned Master Folk artists Nek Chand, and a Wedding Rickshaw from Bangladesh.

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

Folk Art is a treasure, and Lloyd’s Treasure Chest offers a participatory gallery experience highlighting the Museum’s permanent collection of over 136,000 objects of international folk art from over 100 countries, representing thousands of unique cultures. Because the entire collection can never be on view at the same time, collections are carefully stored and cared for in rooms such as our Neutrogena Vault, which visitors can view from the Treasure Chest gallery.

Visitors are invited to think about folk art. In fact, there is no one definition of folk art. In collecting and displaying folk art, the museum considers various concepts: Folk art is traditional art, reflecting shared cultural aesthetics, community values, priorities, and social issues. Folk art may change over time and include innovations in traditions. Folk art is handmade, although it may include new, synthetic, or recycled components. Folk art may constitute income and empowerment for an individual, a family, or a community. Folk art may be art of the everyday or reserved for special occasions. Folk art may be learned formally or informally, from family or other artists. Folk art may be intangible, including various forms of expressive culture like dance, song, poetry, and food ways. Folk art is of, by, and for the people. We mean all people, inclusive of class, culture, community, ethnicity, and religion. Together, we can consider the multitude of perspectives and come closer to understanding “What is Folk Art?”

Rotating thematic displays will offer close-up views of the museum’s folk art collection. In collaboration with the New Mexico History Museum’s exhibition Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat, opening June 23  a display of Syrian folk art opens June 4, 2017. Hands on activities appropriate for ages 3 to 103 in the gallery include: coloring activities, origami and a Javanese musical instrument.  The cultural context of folk art can be explored with a map, book area. The notion that Folk Art may be intangible is explored with a musical instrument: a gender, a gamelan instrument The re-opening brings back some old favorites from past exhibitions, including “Last of the Red Hot Lovers”, an American sculpture made from recycled metal by artist Dwight Martinek (aka “Wild Willie”), “The Followers of Ghandi” by renowned Master Folk artists Nek Chand, and a Wedding Rickshaw from Bangladesh.

 

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Artist Frank Buffalo Hyde (Onondaga/Nez Perce) believes it is the artist’s responsibility to represent the times in which they live. Transforming street art techniques into fine art practices, his humorous and acerbic narrative artworks do exactly that. In I-Witness Culture, Hyde investigates the space where Native Americans exist today: between the ancient and the new; between the accepted truth and the truth; between the known and the unknown. Hyde, who created fourteen paintings and three sculptures for I-Witness, divides his contemporary narrative into three sections: Paranormal: The Truth is Out There; Selfie Skndns; and In-Appropriate.

Pre-millennium, if you asked anyone if Native Americans existed, they would tell you only in the past, in black and white photos. They are almost extinct, they would say, and their lands are gone. If you ever meet one, ask if you can touch their hair, take a picture of them as proof that you actually saw one—like Bigfoot they exist beyond the scope of normal experience.

Post-millennium, Native Americans are part of the digital age, the selfie age, where if something hasn’t been posted to social media, it never happened. We are sharing information at a rate that has never been possible before in human history: We no longer just experience reality; we filter reality through our electronic devices. Today’s Native artists use technology as a tool of Indigenous activism, a means to document, and a form of validation.

In a nation obsessed with sameness—afraid of difference—popular culture homogenizes indigenous cultures, "honoring" us with fashion lines, misogynistic music videos, or offensive mascots and Halloween costumes. Today, these stereotypes and romantic notions are irrelevant as a new generation of Native American artists uses social media to let the world know who they are. Today, we are the observers, as well as the observed. We are here, we are educated, and we define Indian art.

 

 

 

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Artist Frank Buffalo Hyde (Onondaga/Nez Perce) believes it is the artist’s responsibility to represent the times in which they live. Transforming street art techniques into fine art practices, his humorous and acerbic narrative artworks do exactly that. In I-Witness Culture, Hyde investigates the space where Native Americans exist today: between the ancient and the new; between the accepted truth and the truth; between the known and the unknown. Hyde, who created fourteen paintings and three sculptures for I-Witness, divides his contemporary narrative into three sections: Paranormal: The Truth is Out There; Selfie Skndns; and In-Appropriate.

Pre-millennium, if you asked anyone if Native Americans existed, they would tell you only in the past, in black and white photos. They are almost extinct, they would say, and their lands are gone. If you ever meet one, ask if you can touch their hair, take a picture of them as proof that you actually saw one—like Bigfoot they exist beyond the scope of normal experience.

Post-millennium, Native Americans are part of the digital age, the selfie age, where if something hasn’t been posted to social media, it never happened. We are sharing information at a rate that has never been possible before in human history: We no longer just experience reality; we filter reality through our electronic devices. Today’s Native artists use technology as a tool of Indigenous activism, a means to document, and a form of validation.

In a nation obsessed with sameness—afraid of difference—popular culture homogenizes indigenous cultures, "honoring" us with fashion lines, misogynistic music videos, or offensive mascots and Halloween costumes. Today, these stereotypes and romantic notions are irrelevant as a new generation of Native American artists uses social media to let the world know who they are. Today, we are the observers, as well as the observed. We are here, we are educated, and we define Indian art.

 

 

 

[5] =>

Artist Frank Buffalo Hyde (Onondaga/Nez Perce) believes it is the artist’s responsibility to represent the times in which they live. Transforming street art techniques into fine art practices, his humorous and acerbic narrative artworks do exactly that. In I-Witness Culture, Hyde investigates the space where Native Americans exist today: between the ancient and the new; between the accepted truth and the truth; between the known and the unknown. Hyde, who created fourteen paintings and three sculptures for I-Witness, divides his contemporary narrative into three sections: Paranormal: The Truth is Out There; Selfie Skndns; and In-Appropriate

Pre-millennium, if you asked anyone if Native Americans existed, they would tell you only in the past, in black and white photos. They are almost extinct, they would say, and their lands are gone. If you ever meet one, ask if you can touch their hair, take a picture of them as proof that you actually saw one—like Bigfoot they exist beyond the scope of normal experience.

Post-millennium, Native Americans are part of the digital age, the selfie age, where if something hasn’t been posted to social media, it never happened. We are sharing information at a rate that has never been possible before in human history: We no longer just experience reality; we filter reality through our electronic devices. Today’s Native artists use technology as a tool of Indigenous activism, a means to document, and a form of validation. 

In a nation obsessed with sameness—afraid of difference—popular culture homogenizes indigenous cultures, "honoring" us with fashion lines, misogynistic music videos, or offensive mascots and Halloween costumes. Today, these stereotypes and romantic notions are irrelevant as a new generation of Native American artists uses social media to let the world know who they are. Today, we are the observers, as well as the observed. We are here, we are educated, and we define Indian art.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Artist Frank Buffalo Hyde (Onondaga/Nez Perce) believes it is the artist’s responsibility to represent the times in which they live. Transforming street art techniques into fine art practices, his humorous and acerbic narrative artworks do exactly that. In I-Witness Culture, Hyde investigates the space where Native Americans exist today: between the ancient and the new; between the accepted truth and the truth; between the known and the unknown. Hyde, who created fourteen paintings and three sculptures for I-Witness, divides his contemporary narrative into three sections: Paranormal: The Truth is Out There; Selfie Skndns; and In-Appropriate

Pre-millennium, if you asked anyone if Native Americans existed, they would tell you only in the past, in black and white photos. They are almost extinct, they would say, and their lands are gone. If you ever meet one, ask if you can touch their hair, take a picture of them as proof that you actually saw one—like Bigfoot they exist beyond the scope of normal experience.

Post-millennium, Native Americans are part of the digital age, the selfie age, where if something hasn’t been posted to social media, it never happened. We are sharing information at a rate that has never been possible before in human history: We no longer just experience reality; we filter reality through our electronic devices. Today’s Native artists use technology as a tool of Indigenous activism, a means to document, and a form of validation. 

In a nation obsessed with sameness—afraid of difference—popular culture homogenizes indigenous cultures, "honoring" us with fashion lines, misogynistic music videos, or offensive mascots and Halloween costumes. Today, these stereotypes and romantic notions are irrelevant as a new generation of Native American artists uses social media to let the world know who they are. Today, we are the observers, as well as the observed. We are here, we are educated, and we define Indian art.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 2803_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 2803_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-02-03 [eventStartDate] => 2017-02-03 [9] => 2018-01-07 [eventEndDate] => 2018-01-07 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 1 [instID] => 1 [15] => 107 [contactID] => 107 [16] => 2017-07-19 16:05:15 [eventUpdated] => 2017-07-19 16:05:15 [17] => 2803_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 2803_1200.jpg [18] => 1 [19] => Museum of Indian Arts and Culture [instName] => Museum of Indian Arts and Culture [20] => 1.jpg [instFileName] => 1.jpg [urlSlug] => i-witness-culture-frank-buffalo-hyde ) [17] => Array ( [0] => 3412 [eventID] => 3412 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => ¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! [eventTitle] => ¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! celebrates the NHCC Art Museum’s growing permanent collection with a revitalized vibe and a brand new selection of works. This exhibition was a collaborative project as the entire NHCC Visual Arts staff and interns combed through the collection and worked together to decide which pieces should welcome in 2017. This sampling explores the contributions of these artists and how each work can serve as a reminder of the heart that thrives in strong and resilient communities.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! celebrates the NHCC Art Museum’s growing permanent collection with a revitalized vibe and a brand new selection of works. This exhibition was a collaborative project as the entire NHCC Visual Arts staff and interns combed through the collection and worked together to decide which pieces should welcome in 2017. This sampling explores the contributions of these artists and how each work can serve as a reminder of the heart that thrives in strong and resilient communities.

[5] =>

¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! celebrates the NHCC Art Museum’s growing permanent collection with a revitalized vibe and a brand new selection of works. This exhibition was a collaborative project as the entire NHCC Visual Arts staff and interns combed through the collection and worked together to decide which pieces should welcome in 2017. This sampling explores the contributions of these artists and how each work can serve as a reminder of the heart that thrives in strong and resilient communities.

The collection contains over 2,500 artworks by Hispanic, Chicana/o, and Latina/o, artists from around the globe most of which have been generously donated to the museum by artists and collectors. It reflects the diversity of Latina/o art and expression in all of its vibrancy, creativity, pointed humor and social consciousness. The National Hispanic Cultural Center Art Museum exists to support and engage the work of these artists and share their creations and their stories with the broader community.

[eventFullDescription] =>

¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! celebrates the NHCC Art Museum’s growing permanent collection with a revitalized vibe and a brand new selection of works. This exhibition was a collaborative project as the entire NHCC Visual Arts staff and interns combed through the collection and worked together to decide which pieces should welcome in 2017. This sampling explores the contributions of these artists and how each work can serve as a reminder of the heart that thrives in strong and resilient communities.

The collection contains over 2,500 artworks by Hispanic, Chicana/o, and Latina/o, artists from around the globe most of which have been generously donated to the museum by artists and collectors. It reflects the diversity of Latina/o art and expression in all of its vibrancy, creativity, pointed humor and social consciousness. The National Hispanic Cultural Center Art Museum exists to support and engage the work of these artists and share their creations and their stories with the broader community.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3412_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3412_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-03-05 [eventStartDate] => 2017-03-05 [9] => 2018-12-31 [eventEndDate] => 2018-12-31 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 36 [instID] => 36 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-08-22 12:09:40 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-22 12:09:40 [17] => 3412_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3412_1200.jpg [18] => 36 [19] => National Hispanic Cultural Center [instName] => National Hispanic Cultural Center [20] => 36.jpg [instFileName] => 36.jpg [urlSlug] => aqui-estamos-the-heart-of-arte ) [18] => Array ( [0] => 2834 [eventID] => 2834 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art [eventTitle] => No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Tramp art is the product of industry, a style of woodworking from the late 19th and early 20th centuries that made use of discarded cigar boxes and fruit crates that were notched and layered to make a variety of domestic objects.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Tramp art is the product of industry, a style of woodworking from the late 19th and early 20th centuries that made use of discarded cigar boxes and fruit crates that were notched and layered to make a variety of domestic objects.

[5] =>

No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art will present more than 150 examples of tramp art, concentrating on works the from the United States, with additional examples from France, Germany, Switzerland, Scandinavia, Canada, Mexico and Brazil to demonstrate the far reach this art form has had.

This is the first large-scale museum exhibition dedicated to tramp art since 1975. For many years, “tramp art” was believed to have been made by itinerants and hobos, thus its name. It has been demonstrated that this notion is largely erroneous, however the name “tramp art” has remained the only terminology used for this practice, and the paucity of scholarly studies to dispel the mistaken notions about tramp art have allowed the myths to persist. No Idle Hands will examine the assumptions related to class, quality, and the anonymity of the makers of tramp art and consider this practice instead through the lens of home and family while tracing its relationship to industry—whether as individual ethos or big industry. No Idle Hands will also include works by contemporary makers, thus establishing tramp art as an ongoing folk art form rather than a vestige of the past.

[eventFullDescription] =>

No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art will present more than 150 examples of tramp art, concentrating on works the from the United States, with additional examples from France, Germany, Switzerland, Scandinavia, Canada, Mexico and Brazil to demonstrate the far reach this art form has had.

This is the first large-scale museum exhibition dedicated to tramp art since 1975. For many years, “tramp art” was believed to have been made by itinerants and hobos, thus its name. It has been demonstrated that this notion is largely erroneous, however the name “tramp art” has remained the only terminology used for this practice, and the paucity of scholarly studies to dispel the mistaken notions about tramp art have allowed the myths to persist. No Idle Hands will examine the assumptions related to class, quality, and the anonymity of the makers of tramp art and consider this practice instead through the lens of home and family while tracing its relationship to industry—whether as individual ethos or big industry. No Idle Hands will also include works by contemporary makers, thus establishing tramp art as an ongoing folk art form rather than a vestige of the past.

[6] => http://moifa.org/exhibitions/exhibition-details?eventID=2834 [eventURL] => http://moifa.org/exhibitions/exhibition-details?eventID=2834 [7] => 2834_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 2834_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-03-12 [eventStartDate] => 2017-03-12 [9] => 2018-09-16 [eventEndDate] => 2018-09-16 [10] => 10:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 10:00:00 [11] => 17:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 17:00:00 [12] => 2 [recurID] => 2 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 2 [instID] => 2 [15] => 93 [contactID] => 93 [16] => 2017-07-19 16:22:27 [eventUpdated] => 2017-07-19 16:22:27 [17] => 2834_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 2834_1200.jpg [18] => 2 [19] => Museum of International Folk Art [instName] => Museum of International Folk Art [20] => 2.jpg [instFileName] => 2.jpg [urlSlug] => no-idle-hands-the-myths-meanings-of-tramp-art ) [19] => Array ( [0] => 3143 [eventID] => 3143 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Jody Naranjo: Revealing Joy [eventTitle] => Jody Naranjo: Revealing Joy [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture will host a solo exhibition featuring the work of current Living Treasure, prolific Santa Clara pueblo potter Jody Naranjo, in the lobby of the museum.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture will host a solo exhibition featuring the work of current Living Treasure, prolific Santa Clara pueblo potter Jody Naranjo, in the lobby of the museum.

[5] => [eventFullDescription] => [6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3143_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3143_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-04-01 [eventStartDate] => 2017-04-01 [9] => 2017-12-31 [eventEndDate] => 2017-12-31 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 1 [instID] => 1 [15] => 107 [contactID] => 107 [16] => 2017-05-04 16:51:34 [eventUpdated] => 2017-05-04 16:51:34 [17] => 3143_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3143_1200.jpg [18] => 1 [19] => Museum of Indian Arts and Culture [instName] => Museum of Indian Arts and Culture [20] => 1.jpg [instFileName] => 1.jpg [urlSlug] => jody-naranjo-revealing-joy ) [20] => Array ( [0] => 3258 [eventID] => 3258 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Sleeping During the Day [eventTitle] => Sleeping During the Day [3] => Vietnam 1968 [eventSubTitle] => Vietnam 1968 [4] =>

There is no shortage of photographs documenting the horrors of the Vietnam War. In fact, between military photographers and the free press, millions of photographs of the Vietnam conflict were taken between 1962 and 1975. But, there are very few that document the war from the perspective of a young gay man serving in the United States Army. 

[eventBriefDescription] =>

There is no shortage of photographs documenting the horrors of the Vietnam War. In fact, between military photographers and the free press, millions of photographs of the Vietnam conflict were taken between 1962 and 1975. But, there are very few that document the war from the perspective of a young gay man serving in the United States Army. 

[5] =>

There is no shortage of photographs documenting the horrors of the Vietnam War.

In fact, between military photographers and the free press, millions of photographs of the Vietnam conflict were taken between 1962 and 1975. But, there are very few that document the war from the perspective of a young gay man serving in the United States Army.

The New Mexico History Museum will display this unique perspective through the photographs of Santa Fean Herbert Lotz, acquired through the museum’s Photo Legacy Project in 2008. The exhibition, Sleeping During the Day: Vietnam 1968, will run from April 7 to October 1, 2017. 

[eventFullDescription] =>

There is no shortage of photographs documenting the horrors of the Vietnam War.

In fact, between military photographers and the free press, millions of photographs of the Vietnam conflict were taken between 1962 and 1975. But, there are very few that document the war from the perspective of a young gay man serving in the United States Army.

The New Mexico History Museum will display this unique perspective through the photographs of Santa Fean Herbert Lotz, acquired through the museum’s Photo Legacy Project in 2008. The exhibition, Sleeping During the Day: Vietnam 1968, will run from April 7 to October 1, 2017. 

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3258_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3258_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-04-07 [eventStartDate] => 2017-04-07 [9] => 2017-10-01 [eventEndDate] => 2017-10-01 [10] => 10:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 10:00:00 [11] => 17:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 17:00:00 [12] => 2 [recurID] => 2 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 19 [instID] => 19 [15] => 52 [contactID] => 52 [16] => 2017-08-01 23:08:44 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-01 23:08:44 [17] => 3258_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3258_1200.jpg [18] => 19 [19] => New Mexico History Museum [instName] => New Mexico History Museum [20] => 19.jpg [instFileName] => 19.jpg [urlSlug] => sleeping-during-the-day ) [21] => Array ( [0] => 3413 [eventID] => 3413 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Outstanding in His Field: San Ysidro—Patron Saint of Farmers [eventTitle] => Outstanding in His Field: San Ysidro—Patron Saint of Farmers [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Each spring, New Mexico communities celebrate San Ysidro (aka San Isidro or Saint Isidore) the patron saint of farmers, gardeners, and workers. San Ysidro blesses the fields, brings rain and discourages drought, and assures a healthy growing season for local crops such as chile, beans, corn and squash.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Each spring, New Mexico communities celebrate San Ysidro (aka San Isidro or Saint Isidore) the patron saint of farmers, gardeners, and workers. San Ysidro blesses the fields, brings rain and discourages drought, and assures a healthy growing season for local crops such as chile, beans, corn and squash.

[5] =>

Each spring, New Mexico communities celebrate San Ysidro (aka San Isidro or Saint Isidore) the patron saint of farmers, gardeners, and workers. San Ysidro blesses the fields, brings rain and discourages drought, and assures a healthy growing season for local crops such as chile, beans, corn and squash.

The exhibition highlights contemporary and traditional depictions of this adored saint through approximately 65 art works by artists of all ages. New Mexican artist revere San Ysidro and a unique sense of place is reflected through these diverse interpretations of his image.

The NHCC is collaborating with numerous community members and organizations throughout the duration of this exhibition which runs through planting and harvesting seasons. This exhibition also will include a celebration of San Ysidro Feast Day. Traditionally observed on May 15, join the NHCC as we celebrate San Ysidro’s Feast Day on May 13, from 10 am-2 pm, with local farmers, activities, food, artists and so much more!

Please check www.nmhccnm.org/events for details on additional related programs, talks and tours.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Each spring, New Mexico communities celebrate San Ysidro (aka San Isidro or Saint Isidore) the patron saint of farmers, gardeners, and workers. San Ysidro blesses the fields, brings rain and discourages drought, and assures a healthy growing season for local crops such as chile, beans, corn and squash.

The exhibition highlights contemporary and traditional depictions of this adored saint through approximately 65 art works by artists of all ages. New Mexican artist revere San Ysidro and a unique sense of place is reflected through these diverse interpretations of his image.

The NHCC is collaborating with numerous community members and organizations throughout the duration of this exhibition which runs through planting and harvesting seasons. This exhibition also will include a celebration of San Ysidro Feast Day. Traditionally observed on May 15, join the NHCC as we celebrate San Ysidro’s Feast Day on May 13, from 10 am-2 pm, with local farmers, activities, food, artists and so much more!

Please check www.nmhccnm.org/events for details on additional related programs, talks and tours.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3413_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3413_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-04-21 [eventStartDate] => 2017-04-21 [9] => 2017-11-05 [eventEndDate] => 2017-11-05 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 36 [instID] => 36 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-08-22 12:11:23 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-22 12:11:23 [17] => 3413_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3413_1200.jpg [18] => 36 [19] => National Hispanic Cultural Center [instName] => National Hispanic Cultural Center [20] => 36.jpg [instFileName] => 36.jpg [urlSlug] => outstanding-in-his-field-san-ysidropatron-saint-of-farmers ) [22] => Array ( [0] => 3166 [eventID] => 3166 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Voices of the Counterculture in the Southwest [eventTitle] => Voices of the Counterculture in the Southwest [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

At a time when concerts and gatherings on the West Coast gave birth to 1967’s infamous “Summer of Love,” New Mexico was experiencing its own social and environmental revolution depicted in Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest.

On display through February 11, 2018, the exhibition spans the decades of the 60s and 70s exploring this influx of young people to New Mexico and the subsequent collision of cultures. Through archival footage, oral histories, photography, ephemera and artifacts, the exhibition examines this cultural revolution and asks how these forms of rebellion inform the ways we think about contemporary social and political questions of what it means to be an engaged citizen.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

At a time when concerts and gatherings on the West Coast gave birth to 1967’s infamous “Summer of Love,” New Mexico was experiencing its own social and environmental revolution depicted in Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest.

On display through February 11, 2018, the exhibition spans the decades of the 60s and 70s exploring this influx of young people to New Mexico and the subsequent collision of cultures. Through archival footage, oral histories, photography, ephemera and artifacts, the exhibition examines this cultural revolution and asks how these forms of rebellion inform the ways we think about contemporary social and political questions of what it means to be an engaged citizen.

[5] =>

At a time when concerts and gatherings on the West Coast gave birth to 1967’s infamous “Summer of Love,” New Mexico was experiencing its own social and environmental revolution depicted in Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest.

As the Vietnam conflict dragged on for more than a decade, and the trajectory of civil rights activism escalated nationally, issues of justice, identity and social norms sparked activism among the nation’s youth. Young people from across the country flocked to alternative living situations in growing communes or organized to fight social and political injustices. From the mid-1960s into the 1970s, the well-known draw of New Mexico’s open skies and cross-cultural environment sparked a pilgrimage of many young people to the area.

On display through February 11, 2018, the exhibition spans the decades of the 60s and 70s exploring this influx of young people to New Mexico and the subsequent collision of cultures. Through archival footage, oral histories, photography, ephemera and artifacts, the exhibition examines this cultural revolution and asks how these forms of rebellion inform the ways we think about contemporary social and political questions of what it means to be an engaged citizen.

[eventFullDescription] =>

At a time when concerts and gatherings on the West Coast gave birth to 1967’s infamous “Summer of Love,” New Mexico was experiencing its own social and environmental revolution depicted in Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest.

As the Vietnam conflict dragged on for more than a decade, and the trajectory of civil rights activism escalated nationally, issues of justice, identity and social norms sparked activism among the nation’s youth. Young people from across the country flocked to alternative living situations in growing communes or organized to fight social and political injustices. From the mid-1960s into the 1970s, the well-known draw of New Mexico’s open skies and cross-cultural environment sparked a pilgrimage of many young people to the area.

On display through February 11, 2018, the exhibition spans the decades of the 60s and 70s exploring this influx of young people to New Mexico and the subsequent collision of cultures. Through archival footage, oral histories, photography, ephemera and artifacts, the exhibition examines this cultural revolution and asks how these forms of rebellion inform the ways we think about contemporary social and political questions of what it means to be an engaged citizen.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3166_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3166_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-05-14 [eventStartDate] => 2017-05-14 [9] => 2018-02-11 [eventEndDate] => 2018-02-11 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 19 [instID] => 19 [15] => 119 [contactID] => 119 [16] => 2017-07-12 11:53:26 [eventUpdated] => 2017-07-12 11:53:26 [17] => 3166_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3166_1200.jpg [18] => 19 [19] => New Mexico History Museum [instName] => New Mexico History Museum [20] => 19.jpg [instFileName] => 19.jpg [urlSlug] => voices-of-the-counterculture-in-the-southwest ) [23] => Array ( [0] => 2976 [eventID] => 2976 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate: Strategies Folk Artists Use in Today’s Global Marketplace [eventTitle] => Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate: Strategies Folk Artists Use in Today’s Global Marketplace [3] => in the Mark Naylor & Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience [eventSubTitle] => in the Mark Naylor & Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience [4] =>

The  Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience is an experimental gallery inside the Museum of International Folk Art where the public is invited to help shape the content and form of the exhibition in real tme.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

The  Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience is an experimental gallery inside the Museum of International Folk Art where the public is invited to help shape the content and form of the exhibition in real tme.

[5] =>

Visitors notice the Gallery of Conscience looks different than the rest of the museum.  In this gallery, visitors are invited behind the scenes to participate directly in the creation of an exhibition.  That is why the space looks informal and unpolished- it’s on purpose.  The Gallery of Conscience team seeks to make visitors feel welcome to write comments, leave thoughts and participate in the exhibition’s creation.

Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate is about contemporary folk artists and their relationship with their patrons, buyers and collectors. We are especially interested in understanding the pressures they might feel to keep their traditions alive in the face of modern technological advances and new consumer demands. Visitors will see a kind of "mock up" or series of idea sketches. The artworks will come at a later point in the process- after we have heard from visitors, artists and local community members. 

See six digital stories created as part of a six month master apprenticeship program in 2016, that focues on cross-generational conversation, documentation and learning of traditonal New Mexican folk arts

Iyamopo: My Life in Indigo  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93BQvlaWLoQ

Pueblo Weaving  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dre1SamDIXQ

Native Arts: Rooted in Tradition  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iffnsiFva7k

Colcha Embroidery: Stitching a Story https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2H7J6SyFI8

Unfolding Tradition  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4Lxduz1IFo

Loving Creations in Clay  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-06LO_f2emk

[eventFullDescription] =>

Visitors notice the Gallery of Conscience looks different than the rest of the museum.  In this gallery, visitors are invited behind the scenes to participate directly in the creation of an exhibition.  That is why the space looks informal and unpolished- it’s on purpose.  The Gallery of Conscience team seeks to make visitors feel welcome to write comments, leave thoughts and participate in the exhibition’s creation.

Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate is about contemporary folk artists and their relationship with their patrons, buyers and collectors. We are especially interested in understanding the pressures they might feel to keep their traditions alive in the face of modern technological advances and new consumer demands. Visitors will see a kind of "mock up" or series of idea sketches. The artworks will come at a later point in the process- after we have heard from visitors, artists and local community members. 

See six digital stories created as part of a six month master apprenticeship program in 2016, that focues on cross-generational conversation, documentation and learning of traditonal New Mexican folk arts

Iyamopo: My Life in Indigo  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93BQvlaWLoQ

Pueblo Weaving  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dre1SamDIXQ

Native Arts: Rooted in Tradition  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iffnsiFva7k

Colcha Embroidery: Stitching a Story https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2H7J6SyFI8

Unfolding Tradition  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4Lxduz1IFo

Loving Creations in Clay  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-06LO_f2emk

[6] => http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/exhibition-details?eventID=2966 [eventURL] => http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/exhibition-details?eventID=2966 [7] => 2976_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 2976_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-06-04 [eventStartDate] => 2017-06-04 [9] => 2018-07-16 [eventEndDate] => 2018-07-16 [10] => 10:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 10:00:00 [11] => 17:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 17:00:00 [12] => 2 [recurID] => 2 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 2 [instID] => 2 [15] => 64 [contactID] => 64 [16] => 2017-08-08 15:09:46 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-08 15:09:46 [17] => 2976_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 2976_1200.jpg [18] => 2 [19] => Museum of International Folk Art [instName] => Museum of International Folk Art [20] => 2.jpg [instFileName] => 2.jpg [urlSlug] => negotiate-navigate-innovate-strategies-folk-artists-use-in-todays-global-marketplace ) [24] => Array ( [0] => 3296 [eventID] => 3296 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat [eventTitle] => Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

As Syria’s ongoing civil war, staggering death toll, and displacement of thousands of refugees threatens to destroy Syrian culture, the Palace of the Governors will display seven albums of photographs of historic sites in Syria taken between 1899 and 1909. Entitled Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat, the exhibition will includes a multi-functional information kiosk with insights into Syrian people and culture.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

As Syria’s ongoing civil war, staggering death toll, and displacement of thousands of refugees threatens to destroy Syrian culture, the Palace of the Governors will display seven albums of photographs of historic sites in Syria taken between 1899 and 1909. Entitled Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat, the exhibition will includes a multi-functional information kiosk with insights into Syrian people and culture.

[5] =>

As Syria’s ongoing civil war, staggering death toll, and displacement of thousands of refugees threatens to destroy Syrian culture, the Palace of the Governors will display seven albums of photographs of historic sites in Syria taken between 1899 and 1909. Entitled Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat, the exhibition will includes a multi-functional information kiosk with insights into Syrian people and culture.

Partnering with Curators Without Borders, a non-profit that specializes in innovative museum collaborations for humanitarian response, the exhibition highlights the vast collection of albumen prints, showing not only the historic sites now destroyed in Syria, but representations of its people in adjacent collections within the Photo Archives.

As New Mexico has been the home to many diverse groups through its millennia who sought refuge from social, political, ethnic and religious strife, it continues to welcome most recently Syrian refugee families who are escaping the terrors of life in Syria today. The principal message of the exhibition is one of shared concern, empathy, unity, and support for those suffering amid diaspora.

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

As Syria’s ongoing civil war, staggering death toll, and displacement of thousands of refugees threatens to destroy Syrian culture, the Palace of the Governors will display seven albums of photographs of historic sites in Syria taken between 1899 and 1909. Entitled Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat, the exhibition will includes a multi-functional information kiosk with insights into Syrian people and culture.

Partnering with Curators Without Borders, a non-profit that specializes in innovative museum collaborations for humanitarian response, the exhibition highlights the vast collection of albumen prints, showing not only the historic sites now destroyed in Syria, but representations of its people in adjacent collections within the Photo Archives.

As New Mexico has been the home to many diverse groups through its millennia who sought refuge from social, political, ethnic and religious strife, it continues to welcome most recently Syrian refugee families who are escaping the terrors of life in Syria today. The principal message of the exhibition is one of shared concern, empathy, unity, and support for those suffering amid diaspora.

 

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3296_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3296_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-06-23 [eventStartDate] => 2017-06-23 [9] => 2017-11-05 [eventEndDate] => 2017-11-05 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 19 [instID] => 19 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-08-24 13:38:42 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-24 13:38:42 [17] => 3296_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3296_1200.jpg [18] => 19 [19] => New Mexico History Museum [instName] => New Mexico History Museum [20] => 19.jpg [instFileName] => 19.jpg [urlSlug] => syria-cultural-patrimony-under-threat ) [25] => Array ( [0] => 3411 [eventID] => 3411 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => The Piñata Exhibit (Sure to be a Smash Hit!) [eventTitle] => The Piñata Exhibit (Sure to be a Smash Hit!) [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

The Piñata Exhibit (Sure to be a Smash Hit!) celebrates this popular art form with over 175 examples from Mexico, California, Arizona, Nevada, Texas and New Mexico.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

The Piñata Exhibit (Sure to be a Smash Hit!) celebrates this popular art form with over 175 examples from Mexico, California, Arizona, Nevada, Texas and New Mexico.

[5] =>

The Piñata Exhibit (Sure to be a Smash Hit!) celebrates this popular art form with over 175 examples from Mexico, California, Arizona, Nevada, Texas and New Mexico.

Traditional and iconic works, alongside creations by contemporary piñata artists, illustrate how piñatas maintain their historical and social importance while also reflecting transnational shifts in popular, political, and visual culture.

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

The Piñata Exhibit (Sure to be a Smash Hit!) celebrates this popular art form with over 175 examples from Mexico, California, Arizona, Nevada, Texas and New Mexico.

Traditional and iconic works, alongside creations by contemporary piñata artists, illustrate how piñatas maintain their historical and social importance while also reflecting transnational shifts in popular, political, and visual culture.

 

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Chinese quilts have received little attention from scholars, collectors, or museums.  The examples featured here offer an introduction based on new research by a bi-national consortium of American and Chinese museums, including participation by the Museum of International Folk Art.  Embodying layers of history, identity, and expertise, these quilts reveal new insights into the contemporary lives of minority communities adapting to a period of great change in China.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Chinese quilts have received little attention from scholars, collectors, or museums.  The examples featured here offer an introduction based on new research by a bi-national consortium of American and Chinese museums, including participation by the Museum of International Folk Art.  Embodying layers of history, identity, and expertise, these quilts reveal new insights into the contemporary lives of minority communities adapting to a period of great change in China.

[5] =>

In southwest China, traditional bed coverings, clothing, and household items have long been made from patched and appliqued scraps to create artistic and functional textiles. A bi-national consortium of American and Chinese museums has worked together to document and research these quilts, an art form little known outside certain ethnic minority communities. Although the making and using of these quilts have declined, a surge of renewed interest among scholars, artists, and locals is leading to growing efforts to study the textiles and the skills needed to continue making them.

Download coloring pages from this exhibition.

 

This exhibit is sponsored by The Henry Luce Foundation. Additional support comes from the International Folk Art Foundation; the Museum of New Mexico Foundation and donors to the Exhibitions Development Fund; and the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation. Project partners include Yunnan Nationalities Museum (Kunming, Yunnan, China); Anthropology Museum of Guangxi (Nanning, Guangxi, China); Guizhou Nationalities Museum (Guiyang, Guizhou, China); Michigan State University Museum (East Lansing, Michigan, USA); Mathers Museum of World Cultures, Indiana University (Bloomington, Indiana, USA); the International Quilt Study Center and Museum, University of Nebraska-Lincoln (Lincoln, Nebraska, USA); the American Folklore Society; and the Chinese Folklore Society.

[eventFullDescription] =>

In southwest China, traditional bed coverings, clothing, and household items have long been made from patched and appliqued scraps to create artistic and functional textiles. A bi-national consortium of American and Chinese museums has worked together to document and research these quilts, an art form little known outside certain ethnic minority communities. Although the making and using of these quilts have declined, a surge of renewed interest among scholars, artists, and locals is leading to growing efforts to study the textiles and the skills needed to continue making them.

Download coloring pages from this exhibition.

 

This exhibit is sponsored by The Henry Luce Foundation. Additional support comes from the International Folk Art Foundation; the Museum of New Mexico Foundation and donors to the Exhibitions Development Fund; and the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation. Project partners include Yunnan Nationalities Museum (Kunming, Yunnan, China); Anthropology Museum of Guangxi (Nanning, Guangxi, China); Guizhou Nationalities Museum (Guiyang, Guizhou, China); Michigan State University Museum (East Lansing, Michigan, USA); Mathers Museum of World Cultures, Indiana University (Bloomington, Indiana, USA); the International Quilt Study Center and Museum, University of Nebraska-Lincoln (Lincoln, Nebraska, USA); the American Folklore Society; and the Chinese Folklore Society.

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Nirmala  Khandan began photographing birds in his native Sri Lanka before moving to Las Cruces 17 years ago. The drastic change in environment made his artistic journey challenging and fun. His show includes 32 images that are beautifully colorful and display great detail. While his technical expertise and talent in composition are evident, there’s much more to his work. He hopes to raise awareness of the importance of habitat.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Nirmala  Khandan began photographing birds in his native Sri Lanka before moving to Las Cruces 17 years ago. The drastic change in environment made his artistic journey challenging and fun. His show includes 32 images that are beautifully colorful and display great detail. While his technical expertise and talent in composition are evident, there’s much more to his work. He hopes to raise awareness of the importance of habitat.

[5] =>

“On the Wing: The Avian Photography of Nirmala Khandan” is on display in the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum’s Arts Corridor through Dec. 3.

Khandan began photographing birds in his native Sri Lanka before moving to Las Cruces 17 years ago. The drastic change in environment made his artistic journey challenging and fun.

“Birds are unpredictable,” he said. “It’s nice when you can capture an image with a clean background in their habitat. In this exhibit, I have compiled portraits of a variety of birds photographed in their natural habitats here in New Mexico. While most of them are residents, some are migrants. Others may be regularly spotted here, but some (like the Great Kiskadee) are a rare sight in our area.

“I hope viewers will appreciate the fascinating details of the birds, as well as gaining some insight into their behavior and the way in which they interact in their habitat,” he added.

Khandan, whose work features all types of nature and wildlife photography, began sharing his images on social media and is excited to reach a wider audience.

His show includes 32 images that are beautifully colorful and display great detail. While his technical expertise and talent in composition are evident, there’s much more to his work. He hopes to raise awareness of the importance of habitat.

“I hope this exhibit will help raise awareness, especially among younger generations, about the diversity and beauty of local avian life, and encourage the preservation of our ecosystem in the face of rapid urbanization, climate change, and habitat loss.”


[eventFullDescription] =>

“On the Wing: The Avian Photography of Nirmala Khandan” is on display in the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum’s Arts Corridor through Dec. 3.

Khandan began photographing birds in his native Sri Lanka before moving to Las Cruces 17 years ago. The drastic change in environment made his artistic journey challenging and fun.

“Birds are unpredictable,” he said. “It’s nice when you can capture an image with a clean background in their habitat. In this exhibit, I have compiled portraits of a variety of birds photographed in their natural habitats here in New Mexico. While most of them are residents, some are migrants. Others may be regularly spotted here, but some (like the Great Kiskadee) are a rare sight in our area.

“I hope viewers will appreciate the fascinating details of the birds, as well as gaining some insight into their behavior and the way in which they interact in their habitat,” he added.

Khandan, whose work features all types of nature and wildlife photography, began sharing his images on social media and is excited to reach a wider audience.

His show includes 32 images that are beautifully colorful and display great detail. While his technical expertise and talent in composition are evident, there’s much more to his work. He hopes to raise awareness of the importance of habitat.

“I hope this exhibit will help raise awareness, especially among younger generations, about the diversity and beauty of local avian life, and encourage the preservation of our ecosystem in the face of rapid urbanization, climate change, and habitat loss.”


[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3405_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3405_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-08-18 [eventStartDate] => 2017-08-18 [9] => 2017-12-03 [eventEndDate] => 2017-12-03 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 28 [instID] => 28 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-08-22 08:52:46 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-22 08:52:46 [17] => 3405_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3405_1200.jpg [18] => 28 [19] => New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum [instName] => New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum [20] => 28.jpg [instFileName] => 28.jpg [urlSlug] => on-the-wing ) [28] => Array ( [0] => 3148 [eventID] => 3148 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West [eventTitle] => Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Footwear is evocative. It tells us about belonging, love, and social aspiration, reflecting the lives of makers and wearers and offering a window into the past and the present.

This exhibition features sandals that date back thousands of years found in the dry caves of New Mexico and nearby regions; includes Plains and Southwest moccasins, many beautifully beaded or quilled, and exhibited for the first time in decades; and concludes with examples of contemporary high fashion footwear made artists like Teri Greeves, Lisa Telford, and Emil Her Many Horses.

Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on August 27, 2017, and will be on display until September 3, 2018.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Footwear is evocative. It tells us about belonging, love, and social aspiration, reflecting the lives of makers and wearers and offering a window into the past and the present.

This exhibition features sandals that date back thousands of years found in the dry caves of New Mexico and nearby regions; includes Plains and Southwest moccasins, many beautifully beaded or quilled, and exhibited for the first time in decades; and concludes with examples of contemporary high fashion footwear made artists like Teri Greeves, Lisa Telford, and Emil Her Many Horses.

Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on August 27, 2017, and will be on display until September 3, 2018.

[5] =>

Footwear is evocative. The shoe tells us if the wearer was a child or an adult, and can often tell us whether they were an adult man or woman, based on size and style. Shoes retain signs of the wearer, showing imprints of toes and heels and repairs made as much-needed or much-loved footwear became ragged. They can also hint at health problems; for example, bunions and uneven gaits can be visible on the shoes.

How we protect out feet is influenced by the environment (hot, cold, stony, soft), the materials available (leather, plants, beads, quills), and tradition. Tradition guides whether people wear sandals or leather footwear, as well as how they decorate them, but tradition varies over time as conditions, environmental and social, change.

The style of the shoe also tells us about belonging, love, and social aspiration. Beaded moccasins are time-consuming to make, comfortable to wear, and beautiful to behold. Moccasins created for a family member will often reflect the love and commitment of the maker toward the wearer. Some styles of moccasins or sandals were reserved for those with status, wealth, or a special role in society. Footwear reflects the lives of their makers and wearers, offering a window into the past and the present.

This exhibition will feature sandals that date back thousands of years found in the dry caves of New Mexico and nearby regions. The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture has amassed a significant collection of Plains and Southwest moccasins, many beautifully beaded or quilled, and these will be exhibited for the first time in decades. The exhibition will conclude with examples of contemporary high fashion footwear made artists like Teri Greeves, Lisa Telford, and Emil Her Many Horses, showing how traditional designs and techniques are now being used to create gorgeous, meaningful shoes in the 21st Century.

Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on August 27, 2017 and will be on exhibit until September 3, 2018.

Curator’s Statement by Maxine McBrinn, PhD.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Footwear is evocative. The shoe tells us if the wearer was a child or an adult, and can often tell us whether they were an adult man or woman, based on size and style. Shoes retain signs of the wearer, showing imprints of toes and heels and repairs made as much-needed or much-loved footwear became ragged. They can also hint at health problems; for example, bunions and uneven gaits can be visible on the shoes.

How we protect out feet is influenced by the environment (hot, cold, stony, soft), the materials available (leather, plants, beads, quills), and tradition. Tradition guides whether people wear sandals or leather footwear, as well as how they decorate them, but tradition varies over time as conditions, environmental and social, change.

The style of the shoe also tells us about belonging, love, and social aspiration. Beaded moccasins are time-consuming to make, comfortable to wear, and beautiful to behold. Moccasins created for a family member will often reflect the love and commitment of the maker toward the wearer. Some styles of moccasins or sandals were reserved for those with status, wealth, or a special role in society. Footwear reflects the lives of their makers and wearers, offering a window into the past and the present.

This exhibition will feature sandals that date back thousands of years found in the dry caves of New Mexico and nearby regions. The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture has amassed a significant collection of Plains and Southwest moccasins, many beautifully beaded or quilled, and these will be exhibited for the first time in decades. The exhibition will conclude with examples of contemporary high fashion footwear made artists like Teri Greeves, Lisa Telford, and Emil Her Many Horses, showing how traditional designs and techniques are now being used to create gorgeous, meaningful shoes in the 21st Century.

Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on August 27, 2017 and will be on exhibit until September 3, 2018.

Curator’s Statement by Maxine McBrinn, PhD.

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The Governor’s Gallery on the 4th floor of the State Capitol is honoring the 2017 recipeints of the New Mexico Governor’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

The Governor’s Gallery on the 4th floor of the State Capitol is honoring the 2017 recipeints of the New Mexico Governor’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts.

[5] =>

The Governor’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts were established in 1974 by Governor Bruce King and First Lady Alice King to celebrate the significant roles – both economic and cultural – that artists, craftspeople and arts supporters play in the life of New Mexico.


The 2017 recipients of this life time achievement award are:


The 2017 Governor’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts exhibition, featuring the work of the recipients takes place in the Governor’s Gallery, 4th Floor, of the State Capitol. Gallery hours are Monday-Friday 8 am - 5 pm

 

The Governor’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts are organized by the New Mexico Museum of Art and New Mexico Arts, divisions of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs.
[eventFullDescription] =>

The Governor’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts were established in 1974 by Governor Bruce King and First Lady Alice King to celebrate the significant roles – both economic and cultural – that artists, craftspeople and arts supporters play in the life of New Mexico.


The 2017 recipients of this life time achievement award are:


The 2017 Governor’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts exhibition, featuring the work of the recipients takes place in the Governor’s Gallery, 4th Floor, of the State Capitol. Gallery hours are Monday-Friday 8 am - 5 pm

 

The Governor’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts are organized by the New Mexico Museum of Art and New Mexico Arts, divisions of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs.
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This exhibit features Mexican prints made by “the Peoples Graphic Workshop” from the collection of Senator Jeff and Anne Bingaman, along with other prints by contemporary artists working with the same commitment and passion for social justice. 

[eventBriefDescription] =>

This exhibit features Mexican prints made by “the Peoples Graphic Workshop” from the collection of Senator Jeff and Anne Bingaman, along with other prints by contemporary artists working with the same commitment and passion for social justice. 

[5] =>

Following the Mexican Revolution, artists came to see the ancient and folk art of Mexico in new light. Building on the foundation of their predecessors Jose Guadalupe Posada and Manuel Manilla, the new generation printmakers of the Taller de Gráfica Popular, or “People’s Graphic Workshop,” used their craft to promote the “progressive and democratic interests of the Mexican people, especially in the fight against fascist reaction.” The main products of their presses were posters, portfolios, fine prints, handbills and even children’s books - printed in woodcut, linoleum and lithography.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Following the Mexican Revolution, artists came to see the ancient and folk art of Mexico in new light. Building on the foundation of their predecessors Jose Guadalupe Posada and Manuel Manilla, the new generation printmakers of the Taller de Gráfica Popular, or “People’s Graphic Workshop,” used their craft to promote the “progressive and democratic interests of the Mexican people, especially in the fight against fascist reaction.” The main products of their presses were posters, portfolios, fine prints, handbills and even children’s books - printed in woodcut, linoleum and lithography.

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Drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive collection, Horizons shows the wide and dynamic range of styles, personalities, cultures, and forms that visual creative expression took here in the 20th century. Featured artists include Robert Henri, Marsden Hartley, John Sloan, Georgia O’Keeffe, Bert Greer Phillips, James Stovall Morris, Victor Higgins, Awa Tsireh, Maria Martinez, Fritz Scholder, Alfred Morang, Cady Wells, Andrew Dasburg, and Gustave Baumann, among many others.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive collection, Horizons shows the wide and dynamic range of styles, personalities, cultures, and forms that visual creative expression took here in the 20th century. Featured artists include Robert Henri, Marsden Hartley, John Sloan, Georgia O’Keeffe, Bert Greer Phillips, James Stovall Morris, Victor Higgins, Awa Tsireh, Maria Martinez, Fritz Scholder, Alfred Morang, Cady Wells, Andrew Dasburg, and Gustave Baumann, among many others.

[5] =>

Drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive collection, Horizons shows the wide and dynamic range of styles, personalities, cultures, and forms that visual creative expression took in the 20th century, and combines to show the heart of a land that became a major center for artistic expression in a remarkable period of human history.

Experience for yourself some the greatest artists who lived and worked in New Mexico in the last century: Robert Henri, Marsden Hartley, John Sloan, Georgia O’Keeffe, Bert Greer Phillips, James Stovall Morris, Victor Higgins, Awa Tsireh, Maria Martinez, Fritz Scholder, Alfred Morang, Cady Wells, Andrew Dasburg, and Gustave Baumann, among many others.

With a contemporary focus since the beginning, the New Mexico Museum of Art has been a progressive advocate for the arts over the past hundred years. Focusing on the museum’s historic collection, Horizons honors our institution’s history as a locus for creativity. This exhibition, including paintings, drawings, prints, and furniture, highlights the impact of the museum in creating an artistic identity for the state.

Major themes will include the founding of the museum, Native arts, a spotlight on Gustave Baumann, 20th century art and community, furniture design in New Mexico, and a selection of work voted on by visitors.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive collection, Horizons shows the wide and dynamic range of styles, personalities, cultures, and forms that visual creative expression took in the 20th century, and combines to show the heart of a land that became a major center for artistic expression in a remarkable period of human history.

Experience for yourself some the greatest artists who lived and worked in New Mexico in the last century: Robert Henri, Marsden Hartley, John Sloan, Georgia O’Keeffe, Bert Greer Phillips, James Stovall Morris, Victor Higgins, Awa Tsireh, Maria Martinez, Fritz Scholder, Alfred Morang, Cady Wells, Andrew Dasburg, and Gustave Baumann, among many others.

With a contemporary focus since the beginning, the New Mexico Museum of Art has been a progressive advocate for the arts over the past hundred years. Focusing on the museum’s historic collection, Horizons honors our institution’s history as a locus for creativity. This exhibition, including paintings, drawings, prints, and furniture, highlights the impact of the museum in creating an artistic identity for the state.

Major themes will include the founding of the museum, Native arts, a spotlight on Gustave Baumann, 20th century art and community, furniture design in New Mexico, and a selection of work voted on by visitors.

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Shifting Light offers a twenty-first century perspective on the museum’s long-term engagement with the popular medium of photography. Using portraits and oral histories, the show introduces some of the personalities in New Mexico’s twentieth-century photography scene, including Laura Gilpin, Ansel Adams, Thomas Barrow, Anne Noggle and Joyce Neimanas, among many.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Shifting Light offers a twenty-first century perspective on the museum’s long-term engagement with the popular medium of photography. Using portraits and oral histories, the show introduces some of the personalities in New Mexico’s twentieth-century photography scene, including Laura Gilpin, Ansel Adams, Thomas Barrow, Anne Noggle and Joyce Neimanas, among many.

[5] =>

Shifting Light offers a twenty-first century perspective on the museum’s long-term engagement with the popular medium of photography. Organized into the broad categories of place, identity, and creativity, the exhibition juxtaposes photographs in ways that amplify their meanings and suggest new narratives. Ansel Adams’ famous 1940 photograph Moonrise, Hernandez is paired with a 1975 landscape by Thomas Barrow from his series Cancellations, while Alfred Stieglitz’s 1918 portrait of Georgia O’Keeffe keeps company with images by Anne Noggle and Joyce Neimanas.

Using portraits and oral histories, the show introduces some of the personalities in New Mexico’s twentieth-century photography scene, such as artist Laura Gilpin and curator Beaumont Newhall. Collectors, another integral part of the photography community, are represented by a changing selection of promised gifts that are pledged as future additions to the museum’s collection. Visitors are invited to write or draw their own memories, favorite photographs, and other responses to the show. Vintage exhibition announcements, brochures, and publications tell a complementary story of photography’s growing prominence at the museum from the mid-1920s to the present.

The exhibition closes with work that challenges perceptions about photography and suggests future directions, including its changing role in museums. 

[eventFullDescription] =>

Shifting Light offers a twenty-first century perspective on the museum’s long-term engagement with the popular medium of photography. Organized into the broad categories of place, identity, and creativity, the exhibition juxtaposes photographs in ways that amplify their meanings and suggest new narratives. Ansel Adams’ famous 1940 photograph Moonrise, Hernandez is paired with a 1975 landscape by Thomas Barrow from his series Cancellations, while Alfred Stieglitz’s 1918 portrait of Georgia O’Keeffe keeps company with images by Anne Noggle and Joyce Neimanas.

Using portraits and oral histories, the show introduces some of the personalities in New Mexico’s twentieth-century photography scene, such as artist Laura Gilpin and curator Beaumont Newhall. Collectors, another integral part of the photography community, are represented by a changing selection of promised gifts that are pledged as future additions to the museum’s collection. Visitors are invited to write or draw their own memories, favorite photographs, and other responses to the show. Vintage exhibition announcements, brochures, and publications tell a complementary story of photography’s growing prominence at the museum from the mid-1920s to the present.

The exhibition closes with work that challenges perceptions about photography and suggests future directions, including its changing role in museums. 

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Contact: Local to Global highlights the engagement of artists with New Mexico, the New Mexico Museum of Art with artists and collectors, and New Mexico’s engagement with the national and international arts community. Featuring the work of artists who have lived and worked in the region, works made in New Mexico and significant works with a connection to art in New Mexico, as well as artworks which address the broader issues of land, location and environment, the exhibition includes art by Bruce Nauman, Agnes Martin, Frederick Hammersley, Susan York, Postcommodity, Ati Maier and Yorgo Alexopoulos, among others.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Contact: Local to Global highlights the engagement of artists with New Mexico, the New Mexico Museum of Art with artists and collectors, and New Mexico’s engagement with the national and international arts community. Featuring the work of artists who have lived and worked in the region, works made in New Mexico and significant works with a connection to art in New Mexico, as well as artworks which address the broader issues of land, location and environment, the exhibition includes art by Bruce Nauman, Agnes Martin, Frederick Hammersley, Susan York, Postcommodity, Ati Maier and Yorgo Alexopoulos, among others.

[5] =>

Contact: Local to Global, like the other centennial exhibitions, highlights the engagement of artists with New Mexico, the Museum of Art with artists and collectors, and New Mexico’s engagement with the national and international arts community. Additionally the exhibition looks beyond those very literal intersections and implicates larger ideas about contact such as our engagement with the land and environment, our communities’ alignment with one another, and more broadly the implications of contact such as the discovery of the New World, and space exploration.

Contact: Local to Global has two interrelated components – the first of which will focus on works by artists like Bruce Nauman, Agnes Martin, Frederick Hammersley and Susan York who have lived and worked in the region, as well as artists and artworks with differing connections to New Mexico.

A second component of more contemporary artworks directly address issues of land, location and environment and will include the site specific installation Pollination by indigenous collaborative Postcommodity, single channel videos The Placeless Place by Berlin and New York based artists Ati Maier, and Yorgo Alexopoulos’s work Everything In-Between. Alexopoulos’ work, a 4K animation with custom electronics, was shot and commissioned in New Mexico underscoring the continued relevance of the centuries-old tradition of artists making work that is a meditation on the New Mexico landscape.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Contact: Local to Global, like the other centennial exhibitions, highlights the engagement of artists with New Mexico, the Museum of Art with artists and collectors, and New Mexico’s engagement with the national and international arts community. Additionally the exhibition looks beyond those very literal intersections and implicates larger ideas about contact such as our engagement with the land and environment, our communities’ alignment with one another, and more broadly the implications of contact such as the discovery of the New World, and space exploration.

Contact: Local to Global has two interrelated components – the first of which will focus on works by artists like Bruce Nauman, Agnes Martin, Frederick Hammersley and Susan York who have lived and worked in the region, as well as artists and artworks with differing connections to New Mexico.

A second component of more contemporary artworks directly address issues of land, location and environment and will include the site specific installation Pollination by indigenous collaborative Postcommodity, single channel videos The Placeless Place by Berlin and New York based artists Ati Maier, and Yorgo Alexopoulos’s work Everything In-Between. Alexopoulos’ work, a 4K animation with custom electronics, was shot and commissioned in New Mexico underscoring the continued relevance of the centuries-old tradition of artists making work that is a meditation on the New Mexico landscape.

[6] => www.nmartmuseum.org [eventURL] => www.nmartmuseum.org [7] => 3418_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3418_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-11-25 [eventStartDate] => 2017-11-25 [9] => 2018-04-29 [eventEndDate] => 2018-04-29 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 3 [instID] => 3 [15] => 128 [contactID] => 128 [16] => 2017-09-06 09:39:28 [eventUpdated] => 2017-09-06 09:39:28 [17] => 3418_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3418_1200.jpg [18] => 3 [19] => New Mexico Museum of Art [instName] => New Mexico Museum of Art [20] => 3.jpg [instFileName] => 3.jpg [urlSlug] => contact-local-to-global ) [34] => Array ( [0] => 2839 [eventID] => 2839 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru [eventTitle] => Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

This exhibition explores the new directions taken by current Peruvian folk artists during the recent decades of social and political upheaval and economic change. The exhibition will highlight the biographies and social histories of contemporary artists along with examples of work that preserve family tradition, reimagine older artforms, reclaim pre-Columbian techniques and styles, and forge new directions for arte popular in the 21st century.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

This exhibition explores the new directions taken by current Peruvian folk artists during the recent decades of social and political upheaval and economic change. The exhibition will highlight the biographies and social histories of contemporary artists along with examples of work that preserve family tradition, reimagine older artforms, reclaim pre-Columbian techniques and styles, and forge new directions for arte popular in the 21st century.

[5] =>

The past forty years have been a time of tremendous change in the Andes, beginning with the Agrarian Reform of 1969 that broke up the large haciendas; a twenty-year internal armed conflict with the Shining Path that engulfed the 1980’s and 1990’s and claimed nearly 70,000 lives; economic swings, rapid development, the recent large investment in preserving archaeological heritage and the current booming tourism industry. 

All of these forces have all shaped the lives of artists and informed the art they create.  Crafting Memory visits a series of contemporary folk artists in Peru and places their work within this larger framework of Peruvian history and social change. The exhibition will explore the many routes through which craft and folk arts are learned and practiced, including multigenerational crafting families, self-taught artisans, and others who came to folk arts as a means of economic survival during the time of violence.  The show includes a third generation silversmith reviving the art of tupus or shawl stick pins that were worn during the Inca Empire; the art of war orphans from the 1980’s who were trained in traditional arts to give hope in dark times; and a collective of young artists in Lima using the medium of silk screening to promote conversations between rural highland and jungle communities with their counterpart migrant neighborhoods in the city, celebrating their shared arts, culture, and customs and emphasizing the value of the handmade, and the ideas, values, and aesthetics that arise from Cultura Popular - common people and everyday life.

[eventFullDescription] =>

The past forty years have been a time of tremendous change in the Andes, beginning with the Agrarian Reform of 1969 that broke up the large haciendas; a twenty-year internal armed conflict with the Shining Path that engulfed the 1980’s and 1990’s and claimed nearly 70,000 lives; economic swings, rapid development, the recent large investment in preserving archaeological heritage and the current booming tourism industry. 

All of these forces have all shaped the lives of artists and informed the art they create.  Crafting Memory visits a series of contemporary folk artists in Peru and places their work within this larger framework of Peruvian history and social change. The exhibition will explore the many routes through which craft and folk arts are learned and practiced, including multigenerational crafting families, self-taught artisans, and others who came to folk arts as a means of economic survival during the time of violence.  The show includes a third generation silversmith reviving the art of tupus or shawl stick pins that were worn during the Inca Empire; the art of war orphans from the 1980’s who were trained in traditional arts to give hope in dark times; and a collective of young artists in Lima using the medium of silk screening to promote conversations between rural highland and jungle communities with their counterpart migrant neighborhoods in the city, celebrating their shared arts, culture, and customs and emphasizing the value of the handmade, and the ideas, values, and aesthetics that arise from Cultura Popular - common people and everyday life.

[6] => http://moifa.org/exhibitions/upcoming.html [eventURL] => http://moifa.org/exhibitions/upcoming.html [7] => 2839_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 2839_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-12-03 [eventStartDate] => 2017-12-03 [9] => 2019-03-10 [eventEndDate] => 2019-03-10 [10] => 10:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 10:00:00 [11] => 17:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 17:00:00 [12] => 2 [recurID] => 2 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 2 [instID] => 2 [15] => 102 [contactID] => 102 [16] => 2017-08-11 14:18:27 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-11 14:18:27 [17] => 2839_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 2839_1200.jpg [18] => 2 [19] => Museum of International Folk Art [instName] => Museum of International Folk Art [20] => 2.jpg [instFileName] => 2.jpg [urlSlug] => crafting-memory-the-art-of-community-in-peru ) [35] => Array ( [0] => 3145 [eventID] => 3145 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans [eventTitle] => Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture will exhibit over 100 objects dating from the late 1880s to the present. Cultural objects will represent the lifeways of the different Apachean groups in New Mexico and Arizona. These cultural objects include basketry, beaded clothing, parfleche, hunting and horse gear.

These groups are: Jicarilla Apache, Mescalero Apache, Fort Sill Apache (Chiricahua), San Carlos Apache and White Mountain Apache.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture will exhibit over 100 objects dating from the late 1880s to the present. Cultural objects will represent the lifeways of the different Apachean groups in New Mexico and Arizona. These cultural objects include basketry, beaded clothing, parfleche, hunting and horse gear.

These groups are: Jicarilla Apache, Mescalero Apache, Fort Sill Apache (Chiricahua), San Carlos Apache and White Mountain Apache.

[5] =>

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture will exhibit over 100 objects dating from the late 1880s to the present. Cultural objects will represent the lifeways of the different Apachean groups in New Mexico and Arizona. These cultural objects include basketry, beaded clothing, parfleche, hunting and horse gear.

These groups are: Jicarilla Apache, Mescalero Apache, Fort Sill Apache (Chiricahua), San Carlos Apache and White Mountain Apache.

[eventFullDescription] =>

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture will exhibit over 100 objects dating from the late 1880s to the present. Cultural objects will represent the lifeways of the different Apachean groups in New Mexico and Arizona. These cultural objects include basketry, beaded clothing, parfleche, hunting and horse gear.

These groups are: Jicarilla Apache, Mescalero Apache, Fort Sill Apache (Chiricahua), San Carlos Apache and White Mountain Apache.

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Extraordinary how a small glass bead from the island of Murano (Venice, Italy) or the mountains of Bohemia (Czech Republic) can travel around the world, entering into the cultural life of people far distant. Glass beads are the ultimate migrants.  Where they start out is seldom where they end up.  No matter where they originate, the locale that uses them makes them into something specific to their own world view.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Extraordinary how a small glass bead from the island of Murano (Venice, Italy) or the mountains of Bohemia (Czech Republic) can travel around the world, entering into the cultural life of people far distant. Glass beads are the ultimate migrants.  Where they start out is seldom where they end up.  No matter where they originate, the locale that uses them makes them into something specific to their own world view.

[5] =>

Extraordinary how a small glass bead from the island of Murano (Venice, Italy) or the mountains of Bohemia (Czech Republic) can travel around the world, entering into the cultural life of people far distant. Glass beads are the ultimate migrants.  Where they start out is seldom where they end up.  No matter where they originate, the locale that uses them makes them into something specific to their own world view.

This exhibition is about what happens to these beads when they arrive at their final destination, whether it be the African continent (Botswana, Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa), to Borneo, to Burma, to India, Native North America to Latin America (Mexico, Bolivia to Ecuador).  However, this exhibit is not actually about beads, rather it is about the working beads resulting in Beadwork, and what a collective of beads in a garment or an object reveals about the intentions of its makers or users.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Extraordinary how a small glass bead from the island of Murano (Venice, Italy) or the mountains of Bohemia (Czech Republic) can travel around the world, entering into the cultural life of people far distant. Glass beads are the ultimate migrants.  Where they start out is seldom where they end up.  No matter where they originate, the locale that uses them makes them into something specific to their own world view.

This exhibition is about what happens to these beads when they arrive at their final destination, whether it be the African continent (Botswana, Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa), to Borneo, to Burma, to India, Native North America to Latin America (Mexico, Bolivia to Ecuador).  However, this exhibit is not actually about beads, rather it is about the working beads resulting in Beadwork, and what a collective of beads in a garment or an object reveals about the intentions of its makers or users.

[6] => http://moifa.org/exhibition/3348/beadwork-adorns-the-world [eventURL] => http://moifa.org/exhibition/3348/beadwork-adorns-the-world [7] => 3348_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3348_thumb.jpg [8] => 2018-04-22 [eventStartDate] => 2018-04-22 [9] => 2019-02-03 [eventEndDate] => 2019-02-03 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 2 [instID] => 2 [15] => 103 [contactID] => 103 [16] => 2017-09-21 11:07:36 [eventUpdated] => 2017-09-21 11:07:36 [17] => 3348_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3348_1200.jpg [18] => 2 [19] => Museum of International Folk Art [instName] => Museum of International Folk Art [20] => 2.jpg [instFileName] => 2.jpg [urlSlug] => beadwork-adorns-the-world ) [37] => Array ( [0] => 2892 [eventID] => 2892 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Traditional Dress in Contemporary Scandinavia [eventTitle] => Traditional Dress in Contemporary Scandinavia [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Folk Dress. National Costume. Bunad. Gákti. What are these and who has the right to wear them? Traditional Dress in Contemporary Scandinavia examines current efforts to revive, preserve, or innovate styles of dress emblematic of particular historical, regional, religious, or ethnic identities.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Folk Dress. National Costume. Bunad. Gákti. What are these and who has the right to wear them? Traditional Dress in Contemporary Scandinavia examines current efforts to revive, preserve, or innovate styles of dress emblematic of particular historical, regional, religious, or ethnic identities.

[5] =>

Based on fieldwork with wearers and artists, including tailors, designers, shoemakers, leather workers, jewelers and silversmiths, the exhibition highlights the experiences, opinions, and creativity of individuals. Many historical and newly-made garments and accessories will be featured, illustrating the ways traditional dress and notions of the past can become tools for negotiating what it means to be Scandinavian in the 21st century

[eventFullDescription] =>

Based on fieldwork with wearers and artists, including tailors, designers, shoemakers, leather workers, jewelers and silversmiths, the exhibition highlights the experiences, opinions, and creativity of individuals. Many historical and newly-made garments and accessories will be featured, illustrating the ways traditional dress and notions of the past can become tools for negotiating what it means to be Scandinavian in the 21st century

[6] => http://moifa.org/exhibitions/exhibition-details?eventID=2892 [eventURL] => http://moifa.org/exhibitions/exhibition-details?eventID=2892 [7] => 2892_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 2892_thumb.jpg [8] => 2021-01-10 [eventStartDate] => 2021-01-10 [9] => 2021-09-26 [eventEndDate] => 2021-09-26 [10] => 10:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 10:00:00 [11] => 17:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 17:00:00 [12] => 2 [recurID] => 2 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 2 [instID] => 2 [15] => 103 [contactID] => 103 [16] => 2017-01-19 16:00:22 [eventUpdated] => 2017-01-19 16:00:22 [17] => [eventBanner] => [18] => 2 [19] => Museum of International Folk Art [instName] => Museum of International Folk Art [20] => 2.jpg [instFileName] => 2.jpg [urlSlug] => traditional-dress-in-contemporary-scandinavia ) ) --> Department of Cultural Affairs Media Center :: Events Calendar

<< SEPTEMBER 2017 >>
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
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Long Term Exhibition
The Buchsbaum Gallery of Southwestern Pottery
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

The Buchsbaum Gallery features each of the Pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona in a selection of pieces that represent the development of a community tradition. In addition, a changing area of the gallery, entitled Traditions Today highlights the evolving contemporary traditions of the ancient art of pottery making.

more information »

Long Term Exhibition
Here, Now and Always
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Here, Now, and Always is a major exhibition based on eight years of collaboration among Native American elders, artists, scholars, teachers, writers and museum professionals. Voices of fifty Native Americans guide visitors through the Southwest’s indigenous communities and their challenging landscapes. More than 1,300 artifacts from the Museum’s collections are displayed accompanied by poetry, story, song and scholarly discussion.

more information »

Long Term Exhibition
Segesser Hide Paintings
New Mexico History Museum

Though the source of the Segesser Hide Paintings is obscure, their significance cannot be clearer: the hides are rare examples of the earliest known depictions of colonial life in the United States. Moreover, the tanned and smoothed hides carry the very faces of men whose descendants live in New Mexico today...

more information »

Long Term Exhibition
Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción
New Mexico History Museum

Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción contains bultos, retablos, and crucifijos dating from the late 1700s to 1900 which illustrate the distinctive tradition of santo making in New Mexico introduced by settlers from Mexico.

more information »

Long Term Exhibition
Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now
New Mexico History Museum

Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, the main exhibition of the New Mexico History Museum, sweeps across more than 500 years of stories - from early Native inhabitants to today’s residents - told through artifacts, films, photographs, computer interactives, oral histories and more. Together, they breath life into the people who made the American West: Native Americans, Spanish colonists, Mexican traders, Santa Fe Trail riders, fur trappers, outlaws, railroad men, scientists, hippies and artists.

 

more information »

Long Term Exhibition
Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time
New Mexico History Museum
The archaeological and historic roots of America’s oldest capital city

Now 400 years old, Santa Fe was once an infant city on the remote frontier.  Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time, on long-term exhibit in the Palace of the Governors, explores the archaeological evidence and historical documentation of the City Different before the Spanish arrived, as well as at the settling of the first colony in San Gabriel del Yungue, the founding of Santa Fe and its first 100 years as New Mexico’s first capital.

Co-curated by Josef Diaz of the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors and Stephen Post of the DCA/Office of Archaeological Studies, Santa Fe Found collects more than 160 artifacts from four historic sites, along with maps, documents, household goods, weaponry and religious objects. Together, they tell the story of cultural encounters between early colonists and the Native Americans who had long called this place home.

more information »

Long Term Exhibition
Multiple Visions: A Common Bond
Museum of International Folk Art

Multiple Visions: A Common Bond has been the destination for well over a million first-time and repeat visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art. First, second, third, or countless times around, we find our gaze drawn by different objects, different scenes. With more than 10,000 objects to see, this exhibition continues to enchant museum visitors, staff and patrons.

more information »

Long Term Exhibition
Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy
New Mexico History Museum

Will Rogers noted that Fred Harvey “kept the West in food—and wives.” But the company’s Harvey Girls are by no means its only legacy. From the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s 1879 arrival in New Mexico to the 1970 demolition of Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel, the Fred Harvey name and its company’s influence have been felt across New Mexico, not to mention the American West. The company and its New Mexico establishments served as the stage on which people such as Mary Colter were able to fashion an “authentic” tourist experience, along with Herman Schweizer who helped drive the direction of Native American jewelry and crafts as an industry.

Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy, a new section that joins the New Mexico History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, helps tell those stories. Opening December 7, Setting the Standard uses artifacts from the museum’s collection, images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and loans from other museums and private collectors. Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the tale will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.

more information »

Jul 17, 2016 - Oct 22, 2017
Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Sponge Bob Square Pants, Pac Man, and Curious George, all sporting a particularly Native American twist, are just a few images from popular mainstream culture seen in the exhibition, Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art.

The free to the public opening for Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture is on July 17, 2016 from 1 to 4 pm and the show runs through October 22, 2017.

Featuring nearly 100 objects by more than fifty artists from the museum’s collections as well as others borrowed from collectors and artists, the work on view in Into the Future will be in such various media as traditional clothing and jewelry, pottery and weaving, photography and video, through to comics, and on into cyberspace.

 

more information »

Oct 14, 2016 - Oct 14, 2017
Out of the Box: The Art of the Cigar
New Mexico History Museum

From the 1880s into the early 20th century, cigar manufacturers provided an avenue for the lithographic arts to flourish. Layering up to 10 colors in a stone-lithography process and even adding gold embellishments and stamped embossings, the images sold cigars through romantic landscapes, Western adventures, and hot-blooded señoritas. In Out of the Box: The Art of the Cigar, opening Oct. 7, 2016 (precise closing date to be determined), Palace Press Curator Thomas Leech shares primo examples to showcase the rich breadth of artwork created during the golden age of cigar box labels.

more information »

Long Term Exhibition
New Mexico Colonial Home – Circa 1815
New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum

The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked like.

more information »

Long Term Exhibition
Icons of Exploration
New Mexico Museum of Space History

Showcases some of the Museum’s most celebrated objects including a real "moon rock," rare replicas of the first man-made satellites, Sputnik and Explorer, and the Gargoyle, an early guided missile.

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Long Term Exhibition
The Cowboy Way: Drawings by Robert ’Shoofly’ Shufelt
New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum

The first artwork ever to be displayed at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum belonged to Robert “Shoofly” Shufelt. Fifteen years after he graciously loaned some of his lithographs for a temporary exhibit, Shufelt and his wife, Julie, donated his collection to the museum for a long-term exhibition.

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Long Term Exhibition
John P. Stapp Air & Space Park
New Mexico Museum of Space History

Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankinds exploration of space.

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Long Term Exhibition
Generations
New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum

The Museum’s first permanent exhibit takes visitors on an odyssey through 150 generations over 4,000 years of agriculture in New Mexico. 

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Jan 29, 2017 - Dec 29, 2017
Lloyd’s Treasure Chest
Museum of International Folk Art

Folk Art is a treasure, and Lloyd’s Treasure Chest offers a participatory gallery experience highlighting the Museum’s permanent collection of over 136,000 objects of international folk art from over 100 countries, representing thousands of unique cultures. Because the entire collection can never be on view at the same time, collections are carefully stored and cared for in rooms such as our Neutrogena Vault, which visitors can view from the Treasure Chest gallery.

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Feb 3, 2017 - Jan 7, 2018
I-Witness Culture: Frank Buffalo Hyde
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Artist Frank Buffalo Hyde (Onondaga/Nez Perce) believes it is the artist’s responsibility to represent the times in which they live. Transforming street art techniques into fine art practices, his humorous and acerbic narrative artworks do exactly that. In I-Witness Culture, Hyde investigates the space where Native Americans exist today: between the ancient and the new; between the accepted truth and the truth; between the known and the unknown. Hyde, who created fourteen paintings and three sculptures for I-Witness, divides his contemporary narrative into three sections: Paranormal: The Truth is Out There; Selfie Skndns; and In-Appropriate.

Pre-millennium, if you asked anyone if Native Americans existed, they would tell you only in the past, in black and white photos. They are almost extinct, they would say, and their lands are gone. If you ever meet one, ask if you can touch their hair, take a picture of them as proof that you actually saw one—like Bigfoot they exist beyond the scope of normal experience.

Post-millennium, Native Americans are part of the digital age, the selfie age, where if something hasn’t been posted to social media, it never happened. We are sharing information at a rate that has never been possible before in human history: We no longer just experience reality; we filter reality through our electronic devices. Today’s Native artists use technology as a tool of Indigenous activism, a means to document, and a form of validation.

In a nation obsessed with sameness—afraid of difference—popular culture homogenizes indigenous cultures, "honoring" us with fashion lines, misogynistic music videos, or offensive mascots and Halloween costumes. Today, these stereotypes and romantic notions are irrelevant as a new generation of Native American artists uses social media to let the world know who they are. Today, we are the observers, as well as the observed. We are here, we are educated, and we define Indian art.

 

 

 

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Mar 5, 2017 - Dec 31, 2018
¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte!
National Hispanic Cultural Center

¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! celebrates the NHCC Art Museum’s growing permanent collection with a revitalized vibe and a brand new selection of works. This exhibition was a collaborative project as the entire NHCC Visual Arts staff and interns combed through the collection and worked together to decide which pieces should welcome in 2017. This sampling explores the contributions of these artists and how each work can serve as a reminder of the heart that thrives in strong and resilient communities.

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Mar 12, 2017 - Sep 16, 2018
No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art
Museum of International Folk Art

Tramp art is the product of industry, a style of woodworking from the late 19th and early 20th centuries that made use of discarded cigar boxes and fruit crates that were notched and layered to make a variety of domestic objects.

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Apr 1, 2017 - Dec 31, 2017
Jody Naranjo: Revealing Joy
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture will host a solo exhibition featuring the work of current Living Treasure, prolific Santa Clara pueblo potter Jody Naranjo, in the lobby of the museum.

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Apr 7, 2017 - Oct 1, 2017
Sleeping During the Day
New Mexico History Museum
Vietnam 1968

There is no shortage of photographs documenting the horrors of the Vietnam War. In fact, between military photographers and the free press, millions of photographs of the Vietnam conflict were taken between 1962 and 1975. But, there are very few that document the war from the perspective of a young gay man serving in the United States Army. 

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Apr 21, 2017 - Nov 5, 2017
Outstanding in His Field: San Ysidro—Patron Saint of Farmers
National Hispanic Cultural Center

Each spring, New Mexico communities celebrate San Ysidro (aka San Isidro or Saint Isidore) the patron saint of farmers, gardeners, and workers. San Ysidro blesses the fields, brings rain and discourages drought, and assures a healthy growing season for local crops such as chile, beans, corn and squash.

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May 14, 2017 - Feb 11, 2018
Voices of the Counterculture in the Southwest
New Mexico History Museum

At a time when concerts and gatherings on the West Coast gave birth to 1967’s infamous “Summer of Love,” New Mexico was experiencing its own social and environmental revolution depicted in Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest.

On display through February 11, 2018, the exhibition spans the decades of the 60s and 70s exploring this influx of young people to New Mexico and the subsequent collision of cultures. Through archival footage, oral histories, photography, ephemera and artifacts, the exhibition examines this cultural revolution and asks how these forms of rebellion inform the ways we think about contemporary social and political questions of what it means to be an engaged citizen.

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Jun 4, 2017 - Jul 16, 2018
Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate: Strategies Folk Artists Use in Today’s Global Marketplace
Museum of International Folk Art
in the Mark Naylor & Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience

The  Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience is an experimental gallery inside the Museum of International Folk Art where the public is invited to help shape the content and form of the exhibition in real tme.

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Jun 23, 2017 - Nov 5, 2017
Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat
New Mexico History Museum

As Syria’s ongoing civil war, staggering death toll, and displacement of thousands of refugees threatens to destroy Syrian culture, the Palace of the Governors will display seven albums of photographs of historic sites in Syria taken between 1899 and 1909. Entitled Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat, the exhibition will includes a multi-functional information kiosk with insights into Syrian people and culture.

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Jun 23, 2017 - Mar 18, 2018
The Piñata Exhibit (Sure to be a Smash Hit!)
National Hispanic Cultural Center

The Piñata Exhibit (Sure to be a Smash Hit!) celebrates this popular art form with over 175 examples from Mexico, California, Arizona, Nevada, Texas and New Mexico.

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Jul 9, 2017 - Jan 21, 2018
Quilts of Southwest China
Museum of International Folk Art

Chinese quilts have received little attention from scholars, collectors, or museums.  The examples featured here offer an introduction based on new research by a bi-national consortium of American and Chinese museums, including participation by the Museum of International Folk Art.  Embodying layers of history, identity, and expertise, these quilts reveal new insights into the contemporary lives of minority communities adapting to a period of great change in China.

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Aug 18, 2017 - Dec 3, 2017
On the Wing
New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum
The Avian Photography of Nirmala Khandan

Nirmala  Khandan began photographing birds in his native Sri Lanka before moving to Las Cruces 17 years ago. The drastic change in environment made his artistic journey challenging and fun. His show includes 32 images that are beautifully colorful and display great detail. While his technical expertise and talent in composition are evident, there’s much more to his work. He hopes to raise awareness of the importance of habitat.

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Aug 27, 2017 - Sep 3, 2018
Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Footwear is evocative. It tells us about belonging, love, and social aspiration, reflecting the lives of makers and wearers and offering a window into the past and the present.

This exhibition features sandals that date back thousands of years found in the dry caves of New Mexico and nearby regions; includes Plains and Southwest moccasins, many beautifully beaded or quilled, and exhibited for the first time in decades; and concludes with examples of contemporary high fashion footwear made artists like Teri Greeves, Lisa Telford, and Emil Her Many Horses.

Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on August 27, 2017, and will be on display until September 3, 2018.

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Sep 15, 2017 - Dec 31, 2017
Governor’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts exhibition
New Mexico Museum of Art

The Governor’s Gallery on the 4th floor of the State Capitol is honoring the 2017 recipeints of the New Mexico Governor’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts.

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Oct 6, 2017 - Feb 18, 2018
A Mexican Century
New Mexico History Museum
Prints from the Taller de Gráfica Popular

This exhibit features Mexican prints made by “the Peoples Graphic Workshop” from the collection of Senator Jeff and Anne Bingaman, along with other prints by contemporary artists working with the same commitment and passion for social justice. 

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Nov 25, 2017 - Nov 25, 2018
Horizons: People & Place in 20th Century New Mexican Art
New Mexico Museum of Art

Drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive collection, Horizons shows the wide and dynamic range of styles, personalities, cultures, and forms that visual creative expression took here in the 20th century. Featured artists include Robert Henri, Marsden Hartley, John Sloan, Georgia O’Keeffe, Bert Greer Phillips, James Stovall Morris, Victor Higgins, Awa Tsireh, Maria Martinez, Fritz Scholder, Alfred Morang, Cady Wells, Andrew Dasburg, and Gustave Baumann, among many others.

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Nov 25, 2017 - Oct 7, 2018
Shifting Light: Perspectives in Photography
New Mexico Museum of Art

Shifting Light offers a twenty-first century perspective on the museum’s long-term engagement with the popular medium of photography. Using portraits and oral histories, the show introduces some of the personalities in New Mexico’s twentieth-century photography scene, including Laura Gilpin, Ansel Adams, Thomas Barrow, Anne Noggle and Joyce Neimanas, among many.

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Nov 25, 2017 - Apr 29, 2018
Contact: Local to Global
New Mexico Museum of Art

Contact: Local to Global highlights the engagement of artists with New Mexico, the New Mexico Museum of Art with artists and collectors, and New Mexico’s engagement with the national and international arts community. Featuring the work of artists who have lived and worked in the region, works made in New Mexico and significant works with a connection to art in New Mexico, as well as artworks which address the broader issues of land, location and environment, the exhibition includes art by Bruce Nauman, Agnes Martin, Frederick Hammersley, Susan York, Postcommodity, Ati Maier and Yorgo Alexopoulos, among others.

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Dec 3, 2017 - Mar 10, 2019
Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru
Museum of International Folk Art

This exhibition explores the new directions taken by current Peruvian folk artists during the recent decades of social and political upheaval and economic change. The exhibition will highlight the biographies and social histories of contemporary artists along with examples of work that preserve family tradition, reimagine older artforms, reclaim pre-Columbian techniques and styles, and forge new directions for arte popular in the 21st century.

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Dec 10, 2017 - Jul 7, 2019
Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture will exhibit over 100 objects dating from the late 1880s to the present. Cultural objects will represent the lifeways of the different Apachean groups in New Mexico and Arizona. These cultural objects include basketry, beaded clothing, parfleche, hunting and horse gear.

These groups are: Jicarilla Apache, Mescalero Apache, Fort Sill Apache (Chiricahua), San Carlos Apache and White Mountain Apache.

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Apr 22, 2018 - Feb 3, 2019
Beadwork Adorns the World
Museum of International Folk Art

Extraordinary how a small glass bead from the island of Murano (Venice, Italy) or the mountains of Bohemia (Czech Republic) can travel around the world, entering into the cultural life of people far distant. Glass beads are the ultimate migrants.  Where they start out is seldom where they end up.  No matter where they originate, the locale that uses them makes them into something specific to their own world view.

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Jan 10, 2021 - Sep 26, 2021
Traditional Dress in Contemporary Scandinavia
Museum of International Folk Art

Folk Dress. National Costume. Bunad. Gákti. What are these and who has the right to wear them? Traditional Dress in Contemporary Scandinavia examines current efforts to revive, preserve, or innovate styles of dress emblematic of particular historical, regional, religious, or ethnic identities.

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