Beadwork Adorns the World

Apr 22, 2018 through Feb 3, 2019

Extraordinary how a small glass bead from the island of Murano (Venice, Italy) or the mountains of Bohemia (Czech Republic) can travel around the world, entering into the cultural life of people far distant. Glass beads are the ultimate migrants.  Where they start out is seldom where they end up.  No matter where they originate, the locale that uses them makes them into something specific to their own world view.

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“Economic Conundrum” cradle, 2010 Maker: Thomas “Red Owl” Haukaas (b. 1950, Sicanġu Lakota/Creole) Brain-tanned elk hide, glass beads, thread, hawk bells, satin Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Johnson County Community College, Overland Park, Kans

“ndn girlz / rez girlz,” 2009 Teri Greeves (b. 1970, Kiowa nation) High-heeled canvas sneakers, glass beads 10 x 9 x 3.5 in. (25.4 x 22.9 x 8.9 cm.) New Mexico Arts, Art in Public Places Permanent Collection Photograph by Dan Barsotti

Fon’s royal stool, 19th century Bamileke peoples Grasslands, Cameroon Wood, glass beads, raffia cloth 16 1/8 x 17 ¾ x 19 6/8 in. (41 x 45 x 50 cm.) The Field Museum, 175558 Photograph by John Weinstein

Violin case, 1891 Brulé Lakota Rosebud Reservation, South Dakota, USA Glass beads, commercial wood case, native-tanned hide, metal trim 32 x 10 x 4.5 in. (81.3 x 25.4 x 11.4 cm.) Stars and Stripes Foundation, San Francisco, California

Man’s belt, 1881-1921 Romania Leather, cotton, glass beads, metal 34 13/16 x 3 15/16 in. (88.5 x 10 cm.) Museum of International Folk Art, Gift of the Hendershott Family, A.2009.64.2 Photograph by Blair Clark

China poblana blouse, c. 1935 Puebla city and state, México Cotton, glass beads, 24 ½ x 21 1/16 in. (62.25 x 53.5 cm.) Gift of Florence Dibell Bartlett, Museum of International Folk Art, A.1955.1.135 Photograph by Addison Doty

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