Office of Archaeological Studies

International Archaeology Day October 20th & Exhibit Opening “Birds: Spiritual Messengers of the Skies”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 03, 2018

MEDIA CONTACT
Mary Ann Hatchitt
505-681-4014
mahatchitt@outlook.com

(Santa Fe, New Mexico) - The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology and the Office of Archaeological Studies is hosting International Archaeology Day,  October 20th, and simultaneously opening a new exhibit entitled, “Birds: Spiritual Messengers of the Skies.”  The exhibition will be on display through October 11, 2019.

On Saturday, October 20th, in celebration of International Archaeology Day, the Center for New Mexico Archaeology will open its doors to the public from 10:00 AM until 4:00 PM to learn about New Mexico’s fascinating 12,000-year cultural heritage through hands-on activities and demonstrations. Come throw atlatls, shoot bows and arrows, make yucca fiber string, watch pottery firings, learn about coiled basketry, talk with archaeologists, and have a look at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture’s new exhibit: “Birds: Spiritual Messengers of the Skies”

This exhibit explores the importance of birds in Native American culture, as well as how birds are addressed or studied in the field of archaeology. In addition to this, the exhibit informs the visitor about birds in general and their great significance and amazing adaptability. “ Diana Sherman, MIAC Assistant Collections Manager and Exhibit Curator.

Tour the Center for New Mexico Archaeology, the storage facility for New Mexico’s archaeological collections, as well as working research laboratories for the Office of Archaeological Studies. Meet the archaeologists behind the excavations at the Palace of the Governors, the Civic Center, Railyard, Santa Fe County Courthouse, and many other locations throughout the state.

“The staff of Center for New Mexico Archaeology love to open their doors to the public every International Archaeology Day. Every year we offer numerous hands on activities for all ages that allow visitors to learn how certain artifacts were made to how archaeologists document their discoveries.” C. L. Kieffer Nail, MIAC Archaeology Collections Manager.

The Center for New Mexico Archaeology is located at 7 Old Cochiti Road, off of the Caja Del Rio exit of the 599.

 

About the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture: http://miaclab.org/

As the 19th century closed, one of the Southwest’s major "attractions" was its vibrant Native American cultures. In response to unsystematic collecting by Eastern museums, anthropologist Edgar Lee Hewett founded the Museum of New Mexico in 1909 with a mission to collect and preserve Southwest Native American material culture. Several years later, in 1927, John D. Rockefeller founded the renowned Laboratory of Anthropology with a mission to study the Southwest’s indigenous cultures. In 1947 the two institutions merged, bringing together the most inclusive and systematically acquired collection of New Mexican and Southwestern anthropological artifacts in the country. The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture is a division of the Department of Cultural Affairs. Hours: 10 am to 5 pm daily, May through October; closed Mondays November through April, closed Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s. 710 Camino Lejo off Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87504, Phone: (505) 476-1269. Events, news releases and images about activities at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and other in divisions of the Department of Cultural Affairs can be accessed at media.newmexicoculture.org

 


Related Photos

11-LOA - 2018 A troop of Boy Scouts learning how to excavate and record archaeological discoveries in MIAC’s Dig Box. Photographer: Amy Montoya. Photo Courtesy of Museum of Indian Arts & Culture
11-LOA-2018 Black-on-white ceramic jar by Michael Kanteena (Laguna) that will be on display as part of the exhibit “Birds: Spiritual Messengers of the Skies”. Photo Courtesy of Museum of Indian Arts & Culture
11-LOA-2018 Office of Archaeological Studies Director Eric Blinman removes recently fired ceramics during a presentation of ceramic production. Photographer: Amy Montoya, Photo Courtesy of Museum of Indian Arts & Culture
11-LOA-2018 MIAC Research Associate Leon Natker assists a young visitor is finding artifacts on the survey course designed to teach visitors the importance of recording artifact locations and the difficulty of recording surface collections. Photographer:
11-LOA - 2018 : A Ramos Polychrome Bird Effigy from Chihuahua, Mexico that will be on display as part of the exhibit “Birds: Spiritual Messengers of the Skies”. Photo Courtesy of Museum of Indian Arts & Culture
11-LOA-2018-A young visitor of International Archaeology Day 2017 learning how to throw an atlatl on CNMA’s atlatl range. Atlatls were used in prehistory by Native Americans to hunt large game. Photographer: Amy Montoya. Photo Courtesy of Museum of India

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