All Press Releases

  • New Mexico History Museum | Oct 8, 2013

    Free Friday Evenings Are Changing from Weekly to Monthly

    Starting Nov. 1, the New Mexico History Museum’s Free Friday Evenings will switch from every Friday to the first Friday of each month through April. Admission will be free from 5 to 8 pm for everyone on those evenings, and we’ll spice them up with casual staff-led gallery talks about special items in our long-term collections.

    Meet up with friends, learn a little something, then head onto dinner with the money you saved. The talks will be repeated at 5:30 and 6:30 each evening.

    Free Friday Evenings will resume their traditional weekly schedule May through October 2014.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Oct 7, 2013

    An Evening with the Harvey Girls

    This event is SOLD OUT. Thanks for your support!

    Fred Harvey all but invented cultural tourism, inspiring travel on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway that brought new life to the American West. From 4–7 pm on Sunday, Nov. 17, the New Mexico History Museum joins with KNME-TV and La Fonda on the Plaza to celebrate that legacy with a fund-raising event for the museum’s exhibitions and public programming funds.

    An Evening with the Harvey Girls begins with the premiere of Producer Katrina Parks’ new documentary, The Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound, in the History Museum auditorium. Following the film, participants will enjoy an exclusive reception at La Fonda with Harvey House-inspired hors d’oeuvres and tours of newly renovated suites featuring the architectural and design legacies of Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter. Special guests include Parks; former Harvey Girls; and Stephen Fried, author of a 2010 book about the Harvey empire, Appetite for America.

    Tickets are $80; $100 for reserved seating, and are available at the museum’s shops or by calling 505-982-9543. Ticket holders will also receive a complimentary set of note cards featuring historical Harvey images.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Sep 30, 2013

    New Mexico History Museum newsletter: October-November 2013

    Learn more about a special Harvey Girls event, new awards, a new book, and lots of great events at the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors. iIt’s all in the latest edition of The Museum Times. Give it a read by clicking here (or log onto http://media.museumofnewmexico.org/press_releases.php?action=detail&releaseID=284) then tap on "download PDF" at the bottom of the page.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Aug 1, 2013

    The August-September edition of the History Museum Times

    Learn more about the History Museum’s upcoming Wild West Weekend. Meet our newest staffers. Check out the collections vault’s toys, toys, and more toys. It’s all in the latest edition of The Museum Times. Give it a read by clicking here, then tap on "download PDF" at the bottom of the next page.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Jul 22, 2013

    Wild West Weekend: Unleash your inner cowboy

    Immerse yourself in cowboy culture August 9—11 at the New Mexico History Museum’s Wild West Weekend, a special event celebrating the exhibition Cowboys Real and Imagined. Cowboy musicians and poets join trick ropers, saddle makers, silversmiths and more to provide three days of hands-on fun for the whole family. The events are free; the exhibition is by regular admission (Sundays free to NM residents, Friday evenings free to everyone, children 16 and under free daily).

  • New Mexico History Museum | Jul 10, 2013

    Pride in the Saddle in New Mexico: The Story of Gay Rodeo

    Gregory Hinton grew up in the cowboy country of Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado, but evacuated to a California more tolerant of him as a gay man, finally making peace with his roots thanks to gay rodeo. Blake Little showed up at his first gay rodeo in the 1980s intending only to take photographs, but became so enchanted that he eventually earned his spurs as a champion bull rider.

    Hinton and Little will talk about their experiences, joined by Brian Helander, founder and president of the Gay & Lesbian Rodeo Heritage Foundation, and renowned Santa Fe photographer Herb Lotz, on Sunday, Aug. 4, at 2 pm in the New Mexico History Museum Auditorium. “Pride in the Saddle in New Mexico: The Story of Gay Rodeo” is free with admission; Sundays are free to NM residents.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Jun 26, 2013

    From Baseball to Hippies, the Brainpower & Brownbags Lecture Series, 2013, Part 2

    Experts on the early history of baseball, Mable Dodge Luhan, Edith Warner, and hippies will participate in the second half of the 2013 Brainpower & Brownbags Lecture Series. Organized by Tomas Jaehn of the museum’s Fray Angélico Chávez History Library, the lectures are free and open to the public (and, yes, you can bring a lunch). Each lecture begins at noon in the Meem Community Room; enter through the museum’s Washington Avenue doors. Seating is limited. Go to http://media.museumofnewmexico.org/press_releases.php?action=detail&releaseID=271 for details.

     

    Go to http://media.museumofnewmexico.org/press_releases.php?action=detail&releaseID=271 for details.  

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  • New Mexico History Museum | Jun 25, 2013

    Yummy News: History Museum welcomes Dulce Bakery

    Staffers of the New Mexico History Museum are delighted to welcome an offshoot of the popular dulce bakery + coffee to the museum’s Cowden Café. Now up and running, “dulce downtown” is operating a coffee shop and bakery/café in the museum’s second-floor space through this fall. The bakery serves sumptuous helpings of fresh-baked pastries, quiche, coffees and teas to customers eager for red velvet cupcakes, blueberry-ginger scones, banana-walnut muffins, bread pudding, lemon tarts, and cheesecake.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Jun 18, 2013

    Palace Portal Artisans Summer Events

    Besides selling authentic handmade artwork, jewelry, pottery and more beneath the Palace Portal, the Native American Artisans Program of the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors brings back two of its most popular events this summer, the annual Young Natives Arts & Crafts Show, July 6 and 7, and the Palace Portal Artisans’ Celebration during in the SWAIA Santa Fe Indian Market weekend, Aug. 17 and 18.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Jun 14, 2013

    African American Cowboys

    When he heard African American cowboys singing made-up songs under the New Mexico stars, N. Howard “Jack” Thorp decided to compile the world’s first book of campfire lyrics, Songs of the Cowboy.

    Born a slave, George McJunkin grew up to become foreman of the Crowfoot Ranch near Folsom, NM, where he discovered ancient bones that proved, at the time, to be the oldest of their kind.

    From the freed slaves who found work on the earliest cattle drives to the contemporary rodeo circuit, African Americans have been part of New Mexico’s cowboy heritage for generations.

    Learn more about the roles they played at “African American Cowboys” on Sunday, June 30, at 2 pm in the History Museum Auditorium. See the short documentary African American Cowboy: The Forgotten Man of the West, by film student Victoria Lioznyansky, followed by a discussion with Kevin Woodson and Aaron Hopkins of Cowboys of Color, sponsors of the largest multicultural rodeo tour in the world.

    The event, part of the exhibition Cowboys Real and Imagined, is free with admission. Sundays are free with admission; children 16 and under are free every day.

  • New Mexico History Museum | May 31, 2013

    The June-July edition of the History Museum Times

    From a fine-press reprise of the book that started country singers singin' to railroad maps, conservation of an awesome artowork, a photographer of vernacular architecture and more, the latest edition of The Museum Times from the New Mexico History Museum fits the bill. Give it a read by clicking here, then tap on "download PDF" at the bottom of the next page.

    , then tap on "download PDF" at the bottom of the next page.

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  • New Mexico History Museum | May 14, 2013

    The Alzheimer’s Poetry Project Meets Cowboys Real and Imagined

    In the hallowed tradition of campfire tales and cowboy poetry, the Alzheimer’s Poetry Project holds a special session at the New Mexico History Museum on Friday, June 21, 10–11 am. People living with dementia, their family members and the general public are invited to participate in performing and creating poetry inspired by the new exhibit Cowboys Real and Imagined. Poet Gary Glazner, founder and executive director of the Alzheimer's Poetry Project, will lead the session.

    The event is free by reservation, but limited to 30 participants. For more information or reservations, contact Gary Glazner at (505) 577-2250 or gary@alzpoetry.com.

  • New Mexico History Museum | May 6, 2013

    Cowboy Movie Night Starring Ol’ Max Evans

    Author, painter, and raconteur Max Evans is joined by Jim Harris, director of the Lea County Museum, to talk about his storied career, including the making of movies from his works, at 6 pm on Friday, May 17. After jawin’ about the cowboy life, the two will introduce a special showing of The Hi-Lo Country (1998), starring Woody Harrelson, Billy Crudup, and Patricia Arquette. The evening, part of the exhibition Cowboys Real and Imagined (through March 16, 2014), is in the History Museum auditorium. Admission is free every Friday 5-8 pm.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Apr 16, 2013

    History Museum Guides Start New Season of Downtown Walking Tours on April 22

    Museum-trained guides in Santa Fe history will resume their Downtown Walking Tours on April 22, Monday—Saturday, through mid-October. The tours begin at 10:15 am in front of the Blue Gate just south of the New Mexico History Museum’s main entrance at 113 Lincoln Ave. Tours cost $10; children 16 and under free when accompanied by an adult. Museum guides do not accept tips.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Apr 14, 2013

    Yee-Haw: Cowboys Real and Imagined Gallops to an April 14 Opening

    When America needed hard workers, the cowboy was there. The job was dirty and difficult, low-paid and lowly regarded. But when an America torn by the Civil War needed a hero to unite its soul, the unassuming cowboy was an unlikely—and ultimately lasting—pick. Since riding out of Spanish horse culture, he’s been an itinerant hired hand, an outlaw, a movie star, a rodeo athlete, a radio yodeler, and a rhinestoned disco diva. He’s been Spanish, Mexican, African American, Anglo, male, female, straight, and gay. His image has been co-opted to sell trucks, beer, boots, beans, jeans, tires, cigarettes, leather couches, presidential candidates, and a lifestyle far beyond the means of real-life buckaroos.

    Using artifacts and photographs from its wide-ranging collections, along with loans from more than 100 people and museums, Cowboys Real and Imagined (April 14, 2013, through March 16, 2014) blends a chronological history of Southwestern cowboys with the rise of a manufactured mystique as at home on city streets as it is in a stockyard.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Apr 9, 2013

    Saddle Up: Opening Events for Cowboys Real and Imagined

    Live music, family activities and a lecture by guest curator B. Byron Price are among the goodies awaiting people coming to the opening weekend of Cowboys Real and Imagined. Members Preview: 6:30-8 pm Saturday, April 13, with food by Cowgirl BBQ and music by the Free Range Ramblers. Grand Opening: 1-5 pm Sunday April 14 with a 2 pm lecture by guest curator B. Byron Price and, from 3-5 pm, music by Bill Hearne and refreshments by the Women's Board of the Museum of New Mexico.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Apr 3, 2013

    The New Mexico History Museum Times, April-May 2013 edition

    What's new at the New Mexico History Museum? The April 14 opening of Cowboys Real and Imagined. A hunt for hints of cochineal in 18th-century paintings. A staffer who's a killer (or plays one on the silver screen). Check out the latest edition of The Museum Times by clicking here, then tap on "download PDF" at the bottom of the next page.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Mar 10, 2013

    Don Edwards, "America’s Cowboy Balladeer," Comes to the History Museum

    Don Edwards, a premier performer of old-time ballads and cowboy songs, performs in the New Mexico History Museum Auditorium at 2 pm on Sunday, March 10, an advance event for the exhibition Cowboys Real and Imagined, opening April 14. Tickets for Edwards’ performance are $25 at the History Museum Shop; call (505) 982-9543 or go to www.newmexicocreates.org.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Mar 8, 2013

    Women’s History Month Lectures

    Women's Visual Narratives of New Mexico between the World Wars, by Joy Sperling, art history professor at Denison University in Granville, Ohio, at 12 pm, on Wednesday, March 13, in the History Museum's Meem Community Room.

    and

    Your Hands Will Always Be Covered with Ink: Nuns, Widows, Mavericks and Other Passionate Printers, a lecture by Kathleen Walkup, professor of book art and director of the Book Art Program at Mills College, in Oakland, Calif., at 6 pm on Friday, March 22, in the History Museum Auditorium.

    Both lectures are free.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Feb 1, 2013

    The Museum Times, February-March 2013 ed.

    Preparations for the upcoming New Mexico History Museum exhibit, Cowboys Real and Imagined. NPR's StoryCorps comes to the museum. Tales of awesome volunteers. Cool new artifacts. And a guide to upcoming events like cowboy balladeer Don Edwards and a train trip to Lamy. To download the latest edition of the History Museum's Museum Times, click here -- http://media.museumofnewmexico.org/press_releases.php?action=detail&releaseID=252 -- then click on "download PDF" at the bottom of the next page.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Jan 9, 2013

    A Celebration of Print

    Benjamin Franklin never visited New Mexico, but his memory will grace a week’s worth of events commemorating his contributions to music and the printed word, along with his diplomacy in Spain, a contributing factor to victory in the American Revolution.

    The events kick off the Saturday following what would have been Franklin’s 307th birthday (Jan. 17, 1706) and continue through the following week. Among the highlights: Lectures by Dr. Thomas Chávez, former director of the Palace of the Governors and author of the upcoming Palace Press book, Dr. Franklin and Spain; and Dr. Celia López-Chávez, a Latin American scholar at the University of New Mexico. Also, a performance by Mayling Garcia of Corrales on the glass armonica. All of the events are free with admission. Children 16 and under are free every day; Sundays are free to NM residents.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Jan 1, 2013

    The Brainpower & Brownbags Lecture Series, 2013, Part 1

    Experts on the Santa Fe Trail, women of the West, Clyde Tingley, “St. Kate’s” and the Manhattan Project will deliver lectures in the first half of the 2013 Brainpower & Brownbags Lecture Series. The annual series, organized by Tomas Jaehn of the museum’s Fray Angélico Chávez History Library, is free and open to the public (and, yes, you can bring a lunch). Each lecture begins at noon in the Meem Community Room; enter through the museum’s Washington Avenue doors. Seating is limited.

    Click on the red headline (above) for the schedule.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Dec 13, 2012

    Marking Time: A Calendar-Making Workshop

    Keeping track of your daily schedule on a handheld electronic device may be the new normal, but in days of not-so-yore we relied on paper calendars that we marked up, doodled on, and jazzed up with designs of our own, then tacked to the wall for the entire family.

    In that spirit, the education staffs of the New Mexico History Museum and New Mexico Museum of Art invite you to join us in creating personalized calendars for 2013. Pulling inspiration from Illuminating the Word: The Saint John's Bible at the New Mexico History Museum (closing on December 30) and It's About Time: 14,000 Years of Art in New Mexico at the New Mexico Museum of Art, you can illuminate each month with seasonal images, drawings, collages, or glitter and note the days that mean the most to you. Dec. 17 at the History Museum, Jan. 3 at the Museum of Art; workshops at 10:30 am and 2 pm both days.

    Keeping track of your daily schedule on a handheld electronic device may be the new normal, but in days of not-so-yore we relied on paper calendars that we marked up, doodled on, and jazzed up with designs of our own, then tacked to the wall for the entire family.In that spirit, the education staffs of the New Mexico History Museum and New Mexico Museum of Art invite you to join us in creating personalized calendars for 2013. Pulling inspiration from Illuminating the Word: The Saint John's Bible at the New Mexico History Museum (closing on December 30) and It's About Time: 14,000 Years of Art in New Mexico at the New Mexico Museum of Art, you can illuminate each month with seasonal images, drawings, collages, or glitter and note the days that mean the most to you. Dec. 17 at the History Museum, Jan. 3 at the Museum of Art; workshops at 10:30 am and 2 pm both days.

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  • New Mexico History Museum | Nov 20, 2012

    Christmas at the Palace is saved! (The floors are finished)

    After concerns that a reflooring project in the entry of the Palace of the Governors would disrupt our holiday events, workmen put their backs into it and saved the day. Besides showing off its new planks, the Palace will again host Christmas at the Palace, this year for the 28th time, as the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors invites the community to get into the spirit within (and outside of) our walls.

    The complete lineup includes Schola Cantorum and the monks of Christ in the Desert singing songs of the Advent on Dec. 2; Christmas at the Palace, Dec. 7; Las Posadas, Dec. 9; and the Young Native Artists Show and Sale Dec. 15-16.

    After concerns that a reflooring project in the entry of the Palace of the Governors would disrupt our holiday events, workmen put their backs into it and saved the day. Besides showing off its new planks, the Palace will again host Christmas at the Palace, this year for the 28th time, as the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors invites the community to get into the spirit within (and outside of) our walls. The complete lineup includes Schola Cantorum and the monks of Christ in the Desert singing songs of the Advent on Dec. 2; Christmas at the Palace, Dec. 7; Las Posadas, Dec. 9; and the Young Native Artists Show and Sale Dec. 15-16.

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  • New Mexico History Museum | Nov 13, 2012

    Keep Calm and Merry On

    Update: The floors are finished, and Christmas at the Palace will happen as usual. See the updated press release at http://media.museumofnewmexico.org/press_releases.php?action=detail&releaseID=239

    Christmas at the Palace and Las Posadas, two of the most beloved holiday events in Santa Fe, are back again, but with a twist. A reflooring project in the entryway of the Palace of the Governors has forced us to lock its front doors, but we can’t keep Santa from greeting his fans at Christmas at the Palace on Friday, Dec. 7. Well-placed sources tell us that the world’s oldest elf plans to enter the Palace Courtyard through the Blue Gate on Washington Avenue, just south of the Lincoln Avenue entrance, and we advise all interested children to gather there at 5:30 pm with their families. Parts of the Palace, a National Historic Landmark, will be open. As a special treat, we’ll also open the first-floor lobby of the New Mexico History Museum for musical performances and a place to ward off the winter chill. Besides visiting with Santa in the Palace Courtyard, visitors can also enjoy Spanish carols, hot cider, biscochitos, and a piñata. The event, from 5:30—8 pm, is free. Donations of nonperishable foods are welcome. Las Posadas kicks off two nights later, at 5:30 pm on Sunday, Dec. 9.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Sep 5, 2012

    Tall Tales of the Wild West: The Stories of Karl May

    Mention “Winnetou” or “Old Shatterhand” almost anywhere in Europe, and you’ll be met with smiles. But try it in the United States, and you’re more likely to earn a blank stare. Created by German author Karl May, Winnetou and Old Shatterhand are two of the most popular fictional characters of the 19th and 20th century. In a series of novels, they served as trail guides to the mystique of the American West and even today are celebrated in European festivals and theme parks.

    May’s books have outsold those of Louis L’Amour and Zane Grey combined and were beloved by the likes of Albert Einstein, Herman Hesse, Fritz Lang, and Franz Kafka. All of that makes the author (who died in 1912) something of an authority on cowboys, Indians, Rocky Mountains, saloon girls, soldiers, and banks ripe for robbing.

    But there’s a hitch: May never saw the West. Nevertheless, his faith in the glory of the West and his ability to nurture an entire continent’s love for it has drawn countless people across the Atlantic to visit and to stay. From Nov. 18, 2012, to Feb. 9, 2014, the New Mexico History Museum celebrates May’s life, legacy and lasting impact in Tall Tales of the Wild West: The Stories of Karl May.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Aug 21, 2012

    7th Annual Palace Gem & Mineral Show

    Volcanoes, earthquakes, water, wind, and ice created the raw materials that adorn our favorite pieces of jewelry. See and purchase a worldwide variety of the authentic versions of stones, fossils and gems at the 7th annual Palace Gem & Mineral Show, Sept. 28-30, in the Palace Courtyard. New this year: Jewelry-making and mineral-painting workshops join the daily al fresco lectures on a variety of topics.

    Enter for free through the Blue Gate on Lincoln Avenue and meet the miners, traders and jewelers whose stories of how the forces of nature formed geodes, fossils, and turquoise will deepen your appreciation for the treasures beneath our feet. The event is open 10 am to 7 pm on Friday, Sept. 28; and 9 am to 4:30 pm on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 29-30.

     

  • New Mexico History Museum | Aug 20, 2012

    State Historian to Deliver the Santa Fe Fiesta Lecture

    Diego de Vargas’s 1693 reconquest of Santa Fe did not create the peaceful Spanish province he needed for successful governance. To get it, he employed a series of strategies, including compadrazgo (godparenthood) of tribal children, divide-and-conquer, and a sweet helping of chocolate diplomacy.

    State Historian Rick Hendricks will detail what Vargas did and how it worked in ”I Was Godfather to Them: Diego de Vargas and the Reconquest of New Mexico,” the annual Santa Fe Fiesta Lecture at the New Mexico History Museum at 6 pm on Wednesday, Sept. 5. The lecture is sponsored by the Palace Guard, and admission is free to its members; $5 others, at the door. Seating is limited.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Jun 12, 2012

    Pinhole Photography Collection Joins the New Mexico History Museum

    Mysterious, artistic, and as low-tech as an oatmeal box, pinhole photography has captivated everyone from schoolchildren to professional photographers for more than a century. The Pinhole Resource Archives, the world’s largest collection of images, books and cameras, just joined New Mexico’s largest archive of photography, the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives at the New Mexico History Museum.

    The collection was a donation from Pinhole Resource Inc., which is based in New Mexico and led by Eric Renner and Nancy Spencer. Already in the works is a 2014 exhibition, Poetics and Light, celebrating works from the collection.

  • New Mexico History Museum | May 15, 2012

    "Native American Portraits" Opening Reception

    Santa Fe—A dazzling collection of original prints featuring Native Americans from across North America opens this Friday at the New Mexico History Museum. The Women’s Board of the Museum of New Mexico Foundation will serve refreshments from 5-7 pm. The museum is open for free on Fridays from 5-8 pm.

    Native American Portraits: Points of Inquiry pulls some of the most beautiful and elegant portraits from the collections of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives. Dating back to the Civil War, the images reveal photographers’ attempts to portray the lives of Native American peoples. Almost inadvertently, the photographs also portray a nation’s changing attitudes toward Native peoples.

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