Museum of International Folk Art

A Gathering of Voices Public Opening at Museum of International Folk Art

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 16, 2018

MEDIA CONTACT
Kat Andersen
505-670-8060
kat.andersen@state.nm.us

(Santa Fe, New Mexico – Free admission, live music, hands-on art projects are added attractions planned around the opening of A Gathering of Voices: Folk Art from the Judith Espinar and Tom Dillenberg Collection. The exhibition celebrates the promised gift to the Museum of International Folk Art of the collection of Judith Espinar and Tom Dillenberg. The museum opens the exhibition Sunday, Dec. 16, 2018. It runs through September 9, 2019.

The opening reception will be held Sunday, Dec. 16 from 1 – 4 p.m. at the Museum of International Folk Art. The day’s festivities include live jazz music by the Cyrus Campbell Group. Ceramic artists Mary Olson and Lucy will help patrons make festive clay candle holders.

The reception from 2 – 4 p.m. is hosted by the Women’s Board of the Museum of New Mexico. Free admission for everyone sponsored by the Museum of New Mexico Foundation, Fund for Museum Education. www.museumfoundation.org/join

Comprised primarily of ceramic traditions from Mexico, Spain, France, Hungary, Morocco and numerous other countries, the collection also includes rich holdings of New Mexico santos, Latin American retablos and metalwork, furniture and textiles from around the world. The exhibition brings together the various voices of international cultures and living traditions, through the vision of one collector.

 

IMAGES

All photos by Addison Doty. All objects courtesy of Judith Espinar, promised gift to the Museum of International Folk Art.  http://media.newmexicoculture.org/release/776/a-gathering-of-voices-folk-art-from-the-

 

ABOUT JUDITH ESPINAR

Judith Espinar was one of the co-founders of the International Folk Art Market, which was established in 2004 and is today the largest event of its kind focused on the work of master folk artists. She previously worked in the fashion industry in New York for more than 30 years, including serving as fashion director of Gimbels East NYC, Fashion Director of Menswear for all Gimbels stores, Director of Fashion Information for Butterick Fashion, editor-in-chief of Vogue Patterns International, Director of Evan Picone Design Studio, and VIP Design Director of Murjani International. Espinar served on the board of Aid to Artisans, was Project Advisor-Ceramics for USAID sponsored research on “Marketing Viability of Hungarian Craft Industries,” and was one of three Project Directors for the first two years of UNESCO-sponsored “Lead-Free Low Fire Pottery Project” in Mexico. She was previously the owner of The Clay Angel, for years one of Santa Fe’s favorite shops to buy the highest quality folk art and furnishings.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART Founded in 1953 by Florence Dibell Bartlett, the Museum of International Folk Art’s mission is to foster understanding of the traditional arts to illuminate human creativity and shape a humane world. The museum holds the world’s largest international folk art collection of more than 150,000 objects from six continents and over 150 nations, representing a broad range of global artists whose artistic expressions make Santa Fe an international crossroads of culture. For many visitors, fascination with folk art begins upon seeing the whimsical toys and traditional objects within the Girard Collection. For others, the international textiles, ceramics, carvings and other cultural treasures in the Neutrogena Collection provide the allure. The museum’s historic and contemporary Latino and Hispano folk art collections, spanning the Spanish Colonial period to modern-day New Mexico, reflect how artists respond to their time and place in ways both delightful and sobering. In 2010, the museum opened the Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience, where exhibitions encourage visitors to exchange ideas on complex issues of human rights and social justice.

A division of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. 706 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill in Santa Fe, NM 87505. (505) 476-1200. Hours 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily, May through October; closed Mondays November through April. Closed Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Events, news releases and images about activities at the Museum of International Folk Art and other divisions in the Department of Cultural Affairs can be accessed at www.media.newmexicoculture.org


Related Photos

2-MOIFA_Espinar_18: San Francisco de Paula retablo (Mexico), 19th century, metal, glass, paint. Photo: Addison Doty
2- MOIFA_Espinar_10detailA: Detail of jar, Jesús Alvarez Ramírez (Mexico), 2007-08, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_09detail: Detail of face jar, Giacomo Lo Bianco (Sicily), 1993-94, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_11: Serpientes (Serpents), Herón Martínez Mendoza (Mexico), 1987–1988, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_12: Coptic cross (Ethiopia), 19th century, metal. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_13: Openwork jar with lid, Tito Family (Spain), 1990s, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_14: Jobbanas (soup tureens) (Morocco), 19th century, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_15: Jobbana (soup tureen) (Morocco), 19th century, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_16: Detail of bowl, Jorge Guevara, Talavera la Trinidad (Mexico), late 1990s, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_18: San Francisco de Paula retablo (Mexico), 19th century, metal, glass, paint. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_19: Nuestra Señora del Rosario, James M. Córdova (New Mexico), 1998, wood, paint, metal, glass beads. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_21: Detail of figurative candle holder, Alessi Ceramiche (Sicily), 2002-03, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_22: Detail of bowl (Morocco), 19th century, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_23: Detail of bowl, Alisher Narzullaev Ibadullaevich (Uzbekistan), 2004, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_16: Detail of bowl, Jorge Guevara, Talavera la Trinidad (Mexico), late 1990s, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_24: Plate (Mexico), 1970s, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_25: Bowl (Japan), late 1980s, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_26: Plate (Spain or Portugal), early 2000s, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_27: Plate, François and Sylvie Fresnais, Poterie de Sampigny (France), 1997, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_28: Bowl, Gorky González (Mexico), 1980s, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_29: Plate, Fermín Contreras, Talavera La Corona (Mexico), early 1990s, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_30: Plate, Fermín Contreras, Talavera La Corona (Mexico), early 1990s, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_31: Plate (Morocco), 1980s, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_32: Plate (Morocco), 1980s, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_33: Plate, Noble (Spain), late 1990s, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty
2-MOIFA_Espinar_34: Bowl, Pedro de la Cal (Spain), mid-1990s, ceramic. Photo: Addison Doty

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