Apr 13, 2019 - Nov 17, 2019
Social & Sublime: Land, Place, and Art
New Mexico Museum of Art

Social & Sublime: Land, Place, and Art exemplifies how artists in the late 19th through the 20th century have engaged with ideas about land and place and examines the way we understand land as it relates to the cultural and artistic trends of our time.

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Apr 7, 2019 - Mar 30, 2020
The Brothers Chongo: A Tragic Comedy in Two Parts
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

More than twenty years after their first joint exhibition at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (MIAC), Diego and Mateo Romero (Cochiti Pueblo) show their latest work as the 2019 Living Treasures, opening April 7, 2019.

The exhibition, The Brothers Chongo: A Tragic Comedy in Two Parts, features Mateo Romero’s lithographs and paintings, as well as Diego Romero’s pottery and lithographs.

Pairing Pueblo imagery with cutting-edge messages, the exhibition will be on view until March 2020. 

Though the brothers employ separate artistic mediums, the exhibition articulates a collective vision of the future for Native people. Both Diego’s pottery and Mateo’s paintings address how to heal communities through a shared experience.

Della Warrior (Otoe-Missouria), director of MIAC, addresses awarding Diego and Mateo Romero as the 2019 Living Treasures. “While their individual careers continue to soar, we are honored to spotlight their talent, unique perspectives and distinct artistic styles with an exhibition of their current work scheduled to open this April.”

Lillia McEnaney curates the exhibition, capturing each of the brothers’ unique styles. Mateo creates bold brushstrokes and contemporary viewpoints with a mix of oil and acrylic paint while Diego’s pottery garners influence through graphic designs—both demonstrating innovative style through social commentary and, at times, humor.

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Mar 30, 2019 - Sep 15, 2019
The Great Unknown: Artists at Glen Canyon and Lake Powell
New Mexico Museum of Art

The Colorado River is a critical source of life in the arid canyons of northern Arizona and southern Utah. Generations of people from near and far have been inspired by its beauty and power. The Great Unknown : Artists at Glen Canyon and Lake Powell uses photographs, paintings and writings to tell the stories of several groups of like-minded people who made repeated visits to the area known as Glen Canyon on the Colorado, Glen Canyon Dam and the resultant Lake Powell. Beginning with pieces by some of the early Native inhabitants of the region, the show then briefly touches on images related to European and then Anglo American exploration of the Colorado River. Moving into the twentieth century, the show focuses on groups of artist travelers who visited Glen Canyon repeatedly before the Glen Canyon Dam was built in 1963.

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Mar 1, 2019 - Mar 1, 2020
We the Rosies: Women at Work
New Mexico History Museum

In collaboration with the crowdsourcing sculpture collective We the Builders, the New Mexico History Museum will exhibit We the Rosies: Women at Work.

This exhibit, celebrating the 1940’s iconic symbol Rosie the Riveter, which has stood as an international symbol of women’s labor and empowerment, will open during this year’s women’s history month.

The exhibit showcases a 3D printed sculpture of Rosie created through the joint effort of an international body of 700 persons, containing 2,625 individual parts, and will include ongoing profiles of New Mexico’s working women.

This exhibit endeavors to celebrate the many historic women who worked beyond expectations, giving the generations to follow much inspiration.

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Feb 23, 2019 - Oct 27, 2019
Beyond Standing Rock
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

This exhibit focuses heavily on the events leading up to the DAPL construction and the experiences of many who were at Standing Rock during the protest. However, the exhibit will also highlight other examples of similar encroachments and violations of Native American sovereignty, many of which have impacted Native health and sacred lands.

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Feb 23, 2019 - Jun 23, 2019
Brain: The Inside Story
New Mexico Museum of Natural History &Science

Brain: The Inside Story explores the way the human brain works, specifically as it relates to senses ("Your Sensing Brain"), emotions ("Your Emotional Brain"), thinking ("Your Thinking Brain"), how the brain ages ("Your Changing Brain"), and how technological advances may change our brains in the future ("Your 21st Century Brain").

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Feb 1, 2019 - Feb 1, 2020
The Massacre of Don Pedro Villasur
New Mexico History Museum

This exhibition features 23 original graphic history art works by Santa Fe artist Turner Avery Mark-Jacobs. This display, ’The Massacre of Don Pedro Villasur,’ narrates the history of an ill-fated Spanish colonial military expedition which set out from Santa Fe in 1720, a story that is also depicted in the History Museum’s Segesser Hide paintings.  

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Jan 26, 2019 - Sep 30, 2019
Drugs: Cost and Consequences
New Mexico Museum of Natural History &Science

Drugs: Costs & Consequences is a traveling exhibit from the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) Museum and the DEA Educational Foundation. Formerly known as Target America, it has traveled to 16 cities over the last 16 years, and been viewed by over 22 million visitors. The exhibit will be on display at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science in Albuquerque, NM, from January 26, 2019, through September 30, 2019. The exhibit will be open daily. Entrance to the exhibit is included in the admission to the museum.

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Jan 6, 2019 - Jan 5, 2020
Community through Making From Peru to New Mexico
Museum of International Folk Art
Comunidad a través de la Creación De Perú a Nuevo México

Community through Making brings together local and Peruvian artists to explore how art shapes healthy and vibrant communities. The installation is a conversation across borders, highlighting three collaborative projects that paired local artists and artists from Peru for 10-day residencies in conjunction with the exhibition Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru. This exhibition in the Gallery of Conscience experiments with community curation, filling the gallery with video, stories, and artworks as created and told by museum program participants over the course of the spring and summer of 2018.

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Dec 16, 2018 - Sep 8, 2019
A Gathering of Voices: Folk Art from the Judith Espinar and Tom Dillenberg Collection
Museum of International Folk Art

A Gathering of Voices celebrates the promised gift of the folk art collection of Judith Espinar and Tom Dillenberg. Comprising primarily ceramic traditions from Mexico, Spain, France, Hungary, Morocco, and numerous other countries, the collection also includes rich holdings of New Mexico santos, Latin American retablos, and metalwork, furniture and textiles from around the world. The exhibition brings together the various voices of international cultures and living traditions, through the vision of one collector.

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Dec 15, 2018 - Jul 28, 2019
Carved & Cast: 20th Century New Mexican Sculpture
New Mexico Museum of Art

Bringing art off the walls and into 3 dimensions, Carved & Cast showcases sculpture in a range of media, genres, and styles that New Mexican artists utilized over the last century. The exhibition highlights the various ways sculpture engages with the cultural, social, and aesthetic interests of the Southwest.

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Nov 17, 2018 - Apr 21, 2019
Wait Until Dark
New Mexico Museum of Art

Selections from the Museum’s art collection that show what happens - or what we think happens - during the night.

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Nov 16, 2018 - Sep 13, 2019
Drawn to the Land: Peter Hurd’s New Mexico
New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum

Drawn to the Land: Peter Hurd’s New Mexico features 24 paintings and some of the artist’s belongings, including one of his palettes, a pair of chaps, sombrero, guitar, and polo helmet and mallet.

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Nov 11, 2018 - Nov 11, 2019
The First World War
New Mexico History Museum
Exhibition opening on the 100th anniversary of Armistice

The First World War exhibition investigates the contributions of New Mexicans to the war, through letters, photographs and objects.

“New Mexico played an important role in both world wars,” said Andrew Wulf, Director of the New Mexico History Museum. “We are proud to be able to recognize and remember that contribution and add The First World War as a permanent exhibition, to underscore the sacrifice and heartfelt letters home from these brave soldiers.”

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Oct 26, 2018 - Jul 28, 2019
On Exhibit: Designs That Defined the Museum of New Mexico
New Mexico History Museum

Santa Fe is widely recognized as a city of museums. These beloved institutions and their exhibitions have long been integral to the fabric of local culture. On Exhibit: Designs That Defined the Museum of New Mexico, presents a fascinating look back at more than a century of changing exhibition design in the historic state museum system. This “exhibit about exhibits” reveals how presentation techniques evolved and helped establish the unique character of the Santa Fe’s museums.

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Oct 20, 2018 - Sep 30, 2019
Birds: Spiritual Messengers of the Skies
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
at the Center for NM Archaeology

Please note this exhibit is at the Center for NM Archaeology, located at 7 Old Cochiti Road, off the Caja Del Rio exit of 599.

Birds are among the most cherished animals with whom we share the Earth. Where birds live well, people thrive. The presence and wellbeing of birds reflects the health of the environment; they share every ecosystem with us, playing the role of hunter and prey, pollinators, scavengers, and dispersers of seeds. Feeding the spirit, they can signify strength, courage and freedom. They are companions to us and inspire us to think beyond our own confinement and limitations. With some 10,000 species of birds in the world, they represent one of the best adapted animals on Earth, dating back to the time of the dinosaurs.

“Birds: Spiritual Messengers of the Skies” explores the importance of birds among Native American culture both in the past and today. It includes information on some of the major bird species of the Southwest and how important birds have been as a resource for tools, feathers and food. Birds in archaeology, how they are studied and what that tells us about the past, is also included. With help from Audubon New Mexico, the exhibit inspires to communicate important aspects of birds and their role in our world.

The exhibit opens on International Archaeology Day, Saturday, October 20, at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology located off the 599 Bypass in Santa Fe at 7 Old Cochiti Road (located off Caja del Rio Road, right across from the Santa Fe Animal Shelter and Humane Society). The Center, which houses the archaeology collections for the State of New Mexico, and the Office of Archaeological Studies, who shares the building, will hold an open house from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will include tours of the facility and many activities and demonstrations for children and adults including atlatl (spear) throwing and archaeology demonstrations. The event is free of charge. Thereafter, the exhibit can be viewed in the lobby of the Center until October 2019, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (excluding holidays).

This exhibit complements The Year of the Bird, the centennial of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act that was passed in 1918 to protect birds from wanton killing. The Year of the Bird is sponsored by National Geographic, the National Audubon Society, BirdLife International and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Visit any of these organizations’ sites to sign up, learn how to help protect birds, and find events near you!

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Oct 17, 2018 - Oct 17, 2019
Back to Bones
New Mexico Museum of Natural History &Science

NMMNHS will revisit its extensive collection with a new, Back to Bones exhibition, highlighting some of its most spectacular vertebrate fossils – the result of over 30 years of collecting efforts. The exhibit will be up for at least a year starting on or about Oct. 17th.

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Jul 27, 2018 - Dec 31, 2019
Creating Tradition - at Epcot Center
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

This special MIAC exhibition - located at Disney World’s Epcot Center (Orlando, FL) - allows visitors to explore the artistry of American Indian communities and learn about traditional Native influences.

“Creating Tradition: Innovation and Change in American Indian Art” showcases authentic, historical Native artifacts alongside contemporary works of American Indian art—demonstrating examples of cultural traditions which have been handed down through generations.

Native communities from 7 geographic regions across the United States are included in the gallery. Their art represents the richness, depth and diversity of Native cultures past and present. Among the featured artists with works on display are fashion designer Loren Aragon (Acoma Pueblo), noted doll-maker Glenda McKay (Ingalik-Athabascan) and Juanita Growing Thunder (Assiniboine Sioux) from the Growing Thunder family of Montana.

This collection is made possible through the collaboration of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (MIAC) in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) in Washington, D.C.

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Jun 3, 2018 - Aug 4, 2019
What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
Dozens of Pieces from a Recently Donated Collection

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC) periodically features art recently acquired through gifts or purchases. What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection, highlights the collection donated to the Museum by Carol Warren, who was a volunteer in the Collections Department for more than 20 years.

The collection consists of over 200 works of art, including paintings, pottery, jewelry and textiles from some of Santa Fe’s most prominent contemporary artists. A selection of this collection will be on exhibit and will include pieces created by renowned artists such as Tony Abeyta, Tammy Garcia, Dan Namingha, and Jody Naranjo.

The exhibition, co-curated by, C.L. Kieffer Nail, Antonio Chavarria, and Valerie Verzuh, will not only highlight outstanding contemporary artists, but it will also feature multigenerational artists by including work of artists within the same family that have crafted their trade alongside each other.

“By displaying pieces made by related artists, we hope to demonstrate ways in which Native artists inspire each other through instruction as well as how individual artists exhibit their own identity through what is essentially a family practice,” said curator C. L. Kieffer Nail.

In accepting new items, whether they were made yesterday or 12,000 years ago, museum staff consider various issues such as curatorial collecting objectives, gaps in collections, potential future use of the objects such as publication and exhibition, storage limitations and special preservation requirements.

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology collections inspire appreciation for and promote knowledge of the diverse native arts, histories, languages, and cultures of the Greater Southwest. This mission is made possible through the active acquisition of material culture that contributes to an understanding of the peoples that made them.

The creative talents of Native artists in the past, present and future, give purpose to the MIAC. This is why it continues to collect and preserve art and artifacts made by tribal artists from all time periods. It endeavors to educate visitors about ancient yet living Native cultures, and provide Indian artists with examples of their ancestors’ gifts.

The accessioned collections of the museum are made possible by the generosity of donors and the cultivation of such by the Museum of New Mexico Foundation and its affiliated support groups.

 

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Jun 3, 2018 - May 27, 2019
Atomic Histories
New Mexico History Museum
Remembering New Mexico’s Nuclear Past

The Atomic Histories exhibit explores the most famous events, sometimes little known stories, and inventions born here which impact our lives, and helps to recognize the remarkable contributions of thousands of people involved in writing New Mexico’s Atomic Histories for the last 75 years. 

Curated by Melanie LaBorwit, Educator with the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors.

Photo courtesy of the Los Alamos Historical Society Archives 

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Jun 1, 2018 - Jun 2, 2019
Hweeldi: The Woven Tribute
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
Commemorating the Long Walk

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (MIAC) is commemorating the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Bosque Redondo, signed June 1, 1868, by displaying an extraordinary wool rug woven in tribute to the Long Walk. Created in the early 1900s, the rug is an impressive 9 ft. by 15 ft., last displayed at MIAC in 1996.

While the identity of the weavers of the piece remains unknown, Navajo oral history – and likely some first-hand accounts – informed the weavers along the way with their design. 

In 1868, the Long Walk was initiated by the United States military as part of Manifest Destiny, the concept that expansion of the United States in the 1800s was both justified and inevitable. Only the 1868 treaty allowed the Navajo to return to their Diné Bikéyah (Navajo sacred lands) in northwestern New Mexico, where they rebuilt as a nation of herders, farmers, and weavers.

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Dec 10, 2017 - Jun 2, 2019
Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
Note: New closing date of June 2, 2019

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture will exhibit over 100 objects dating from the late 1880s to the present. Cultural objects will represent the lifeways of the different Apachean groups in New Mexico and Arizona. These cultural objects include basketry, beaded clothing, hunting and horse gear.

These groups are: Jicarilla Apache, Mescalero Apache, Fort Sill Apache (Chiricahua), San Carlos Apache and White Mountain Apache.

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Dec 3, 2017 - Jul 17, 2019
Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru
Museum of International Folk Art

This exhibition explores the new directions taken by current Peruvian folk artists during the recent decades of social and political upheaval and economic change. The exhibition will highlight the biographies and social histories of contemporary artists along with examples of work that preserve family tradition, reimagine older artforms, reclaim pre-Columbian techniques and styles, and forge new directions for arte popular in the 21st century.

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Long Term Exhibition
New Mexico Colonial Home – Circa 1815
New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum

The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked like.

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Long Term Exhibition
Icons of Exploration
New Mexico Museum of Space History

Showcases some of the Museum’s most celebrated objects including a real "moon rock," rare replicas of the first man-made satellites, Sputnik and Explorer, and the Gargoyle, an early guided missile.

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Long Term Exhibition
The Cowboy Way: Drawings by Robert ’Shoofly’ Shufelt
New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum

The first artwork ever to be displayed at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum belonged to Robert “Shoofly” Shufelt. Fifteen years after he graciously loaned some of his lithographs for a temporary exhibit, Shufelt and his wife, Julie, donated his collection to the museum for a long-term exhibition.

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Long Term Exhibition
John P. Stapp Air & Space Park
New Mexico Museum of Space History

Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankinds exploration of space.

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Long Term Exhibition
Generations
New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum

The Museum’s first permanent exhibit takes visitors on an odyssey through 150 generations over 4,000 years of agriculture in New Mexico. 

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Long Term Exhibition
Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy
New Mexico History Museum

Will Rogers noted that Fred Harvey “kept the West in food—and wives.” But the company’s Harvey Girls are by no means its only legacy. From the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s 1879 arrival in New Mexico to the 1970 demolition of Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel, the Fred Harvey name and its company’s influence have been felt across New Mexico, not to mention the American West. The company and its New Mexico establishments served as the stage on which people such as Mary Colter were able to fashion an “authentic” tourist experience, along with Herman Schweizer who helped drive the direction of Native American jewelry and crafts as an industry.

Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy, a new section that joins the New Mexico History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, helps tell those stories. Opening December 7, Setting the Standard uses artifacts from the museum’s collection, images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and loans from other museums and private collectors. Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the tale will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.

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Long Term Exhibition
Multiple Visions: A Common Bond
Museum of International Folk Art

Multiple Visions: A Common Bond has been the destination for well over a million first-time and repeat visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art. First, second, third, or countless times around, we find our gaze drawn by different objects, different scenes. With more than 10,000 objects to see, this exhibition continues to enchant museum visitors, staff and patrons.

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Long Term Exhibition
Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now
New Mexico History Museum

Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, the main exhibition of the New Mexico History Museum, sweeps across more than 500 years of stories - from early Native inhabitants to today’s residents - told through artifacts, films, photographs, computer interactives, oral histories and more. Together, they breath life into the people who made the American West: Native Americans, Spanish colonists, Mexican traders, Santa Fe Trail riders, fur trappers, outlaws, railroad men, scientists, hippies and artists.

 

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Jan 1, 2009 - Jan 1, 2020
Here, Now and Always
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Here, Now, and Always is a major exhibition based on eight years of collaboration among Native American elders, artists, scholars, teachers, writers and museum professionals. Voices of fifty Native Americans guide visitors through the Southwest’s indigenous communities and their challenging landscapes. More than 1,300 artifacts from the Museum’s collections are displayed accompanied by poetry, story, song and scholarly discussion.

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Long Term Exhibition
The Buchsbaum Gallery of Southwestern Pottery
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

The Buchsbaum Gallery features each of the Pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona in a selection of pieces that represent the development of a community tradition. In addition, a changing area of the gallery, entitled Traditions Today highlights the evolving contemporary traditions of the ancient art of pottery making.

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