Nov 17, 2024 - Nov 17, 2025
iNgqikithi yokuPhica / Weaving Meanings: Telephone Wire Art from South Africa
Museum of International Folk Art

The spectacular art of telephone-wire weaving is the subject of iNgqikithi yokuPhica / Weaving Meanings: Telephone Wire Art from South Africa at the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Foregrounding artists’ voices, Weaving Meanings shares histories of the wire medium in South Africa, from the 16th century uses as currency to the dazzling artworks wire weavers create today. From beer pot lids (izimbenge) to platters and plates, from vessels to sculptural assemblages, works in the exhibition speak to the continued development and significance of this artistic tradition, both locally in KwaZulu-Natal and to global markets and audiences.

Weaving Meanings features historical items alongside contemporary works of art, demonstrating individual and community-based ways of making and knowing. Curated in consultation with Indigenous Knowledge experts in broader Nguni and specific Zulu cultures, this exhibition sheds new light on this artistic medium, highlighting the experiences of the artists themselves through videos featuring interviews and the process of creating wirework.

The first major exhibition of telephone-wire art in any North American museum, Weaving Meanings brings together several significant collections generously donated to the museum by David Arment. Guest curator Dr. Elizabeth Perrill, one of the world’s foremost experts on Zulu ceramics, brings to the project over 15 years of experience collaborating with artists in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and 25 years of engaged research in Southern Africa.

To make a donation to help support this important project, please click HERE.

Image Credit: Telephone wire plate by Ntombifuthi (Magwaza) Sibiya, 515 x 425 mm. Museum of International Folk Art. Photo by Andrew Cerino.

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Aug 9, 2024 - Apr 1, 2025
Between the Lines: Prison Art & Advocacy
Museum of International Folk Art

Between the Lines: Prison Art & Advocacy seeks to re-humanize the incarcerated. Through a combination of in-gallery artworks, fresh multimedia pieces (interviews with returned citizens and allies, art-making demonstrations, etc.) and community-co-developed events, this exhibition will explore prisoners’ rights, recidivism / systemic oppression, and transitional justice.

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Feb 25, 2024 - Aug 18, 2024
Staff Picks: Favorites from the Collection
Museum of International Folk Art

Staff Picks: Favorites from the Collection features objects that were selected by members of the Museum of International Folk Art (MOIFA) staff. This is the first exhibition that MOIFA has presented with work chosen by all staff. The selections highlight the diversity of the museum’s collection and present the perspectives of staff through their favorite works. The MOIFA collection has grown to over 162,000 objects, representing more than 100 countries since its founding in 1953. Staff made their selections by touring museum storage, researching work in the collection, picking pieces from previous exhibitions, or choosing from a geographic area.

Exhibit Information Accessible PDF

Información de la Exposición PDF Accesible

Image: "BoBo bu Ko" Robotic Assemblage, James Bauer, ca. 1994, reused metal and plastic, commercial lawn chair, Alameda, CA, IFAF Collection, FA.1995.71.1V (photography by Kellen Hope)

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Dec 16, 2023 - Jan 16, 2025
18 Miles and ThatÂ’s As Far As It Got: The Lamy Branch of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad
New Mexico History Museum

Enjoy a captivating flashback as the New Mexico History Museum presents "18 Miles and That’s As Far As It Got: The Lamy Branch of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad." This engaging exhibition will delve into the connections between the little town of Lamy and New Mexico’s legendary capital city of Santa Fe, NM.

The centerpiece of the exhibition is the Lamy Train Model. Meticulously crafted by the Santa Fe Model Railroad Club, the 32-foot model transports visitors to the early 1940s, where wood frame and adobe buildings, stockyards, and the “Harvey House” defined the community. 

Photo credit:  Lamy Model Train. Courtesy NMHM

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Dec 3, 2023 - Apr 7, 2024
Protection: Adaptation and Resistance
Museum of International Folk Art

The traveling exhibition Protection: Adaptation and Resistance presents the work of more than 45 Alaska Native artists who explore the themes of climate crisis, struggles for social justice, strengthening communities through ancestral knowledge, and imagining a thriving future. 

The diverse works in the exhibition range from regalia to images of traditional tattooing, graphic design, and posters for public health and well-being. Iñupiaq artist Amber Webb’s 12-foot-high qaspeq (a cloth hooded overshirt) features the drawn portraits of more than 200 Indigenous women who have been missing or murdered in Alaska since 1950. This Memorial Qaspeq makes visible the scale of loss and grief the tragedy of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) has in Indigenous communities, and with this installation, Webb calls for a solution to violence against women and healing for Native communities.

Protection: Adaptation and Resistance is a project of the Bunnell Street Art Center in Homer, Alaska. It is made possible, in part, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts, The CIRI Foundation, the Alaska Community Foundation, Rasmuson Foundation, and the Alaska Humanities Forum.

Protection complements the MOIFA exhibition Ghhúunayúkata/To Keep Them Warm: The Alaska Native Parka, which opened at the museum in May 2023. The idea of protection is also inherent in Ghhúunayúkata/To Keep Them Warm, which examines the Alaska Native parka, a garment made for survival in the harsh environments where Alaska Native peoples live and thrive. Both exhibitions will be on display through April 7, 2024.

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Sep 23, 2023 - Apr 28, 2024
Shadow and Light
New Mexico Museum of Art

Shadow and Light, the inaugural exhibition at the Vladem Contemporary plays upon the famed New Mexico light which is credited for attracting artists and photographers to the region for decades. More importantly, the theme illustrates one of the original notions behind the founding of the New Mexico Museum of Art—the belief that the impact of the arts is far greater than simple replication and illustration. The arts engage the big ideas and experiences of human life.

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Aug 3, 2023 - May 26, 2024
Miguel Trujillo and the Pursuit of Native Voting Rights
New Mexico History Museum

The New Mexico History Museum is proud to present “Miguel Trujillo and the Pursuit of Native Voting Rights”. The special exhibition honors the 75th anniversary of the landmark court case, Trujillo v Garley, which granted Native New Mexicans the right to vote in US elections.

The story is told through an interactive voting booth and shares the fascinating story of Native American suffrage. The ruling in 1948 removed legal and constitutional barriers to voting for Native Americans residing on tribal lands in New Mexico. At the center of this effort is Miguel Trujillo (Isleta Pueblo), a veteran and tribal educator. His tireless pursuit of equitable representation for his people is a noteworthy addition to better-known stories about women’s suffrage and African American voting rights.

Also featured in the exhibition are excerpts from the latest season of Encounter Culture, the official podcast of the Department of Cultural Affairs, produced with the support of the Museum of New Mexico Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Image Credit: Miguel Trujillo’s graduation from the University of New Mexico, 1942. Photograph courtesy of Dr. Michael Trujillo.

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Jul 16, 2023 - Jun 2, 2024
Horizons: Weaving Between the Lines with Diné Textiles
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
Opening July 16, 2023 - Masterpieces Gallery

Santa Fe, NM - The horizon line is both a point of connection between sky and earth and a separation of space. Horizons: Weaving Between the Lines with Diné Textiles at Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC) explores the connections between weaving and photography as modes of engagement with place. By situating these two media in conversation, this exhibition presents each as a way of seeing and knowing Dinétah, the Navajo homeland, emphasizing the land-based and relational practices of Diné (Navajo) weaving. Horizons is on view July 16, 2023, through June 2, 2024.

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May 21, 2023 - Apr 7, 2024
Ghhúunayúkata / To Keep Them Warm: The Alaska Native Parka
Museum of International Folk Art

Ghhúunayúkata / To Keep Them Warm explores the art of the parka, a garment made for survival in the harsh environments where Alaska Native peoples live and thrive.

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May 7, 2023 - May 3, 2024
“Down Home” MIAC 2023 Living Treasure Anthony Lovato (Kewa/Santo Domingo Pueblo)
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Drawing from the MIAC permanent collection and the generosity of private lenders, Down Home brings together decades of Lovato’s work. Selections detailing his trademark corn, horse, and hand motifs are complemented by individual masterpieces evoking family, migration, and cosmology.  

Importantly, the exhibition focuses on Lovato’s interpretation of his own work. Visitors will leave not only with a deeper knowledge of jewelry making and tufa casting, but of Lovato as an artist, community member, and storyteller. As a complement to his artistic practice, Lovato is dedicated to working within his community, serving as an advocate for language revitalization, education, and the power of art to facilitate healing.  

In addition to showing Lovato’s innovative and always one-of-a-kind pendants, stamped necklaces, bracelets, rings, pins, and sculptural items the exhibition also includes the work of his grandfather, Leo Coriz.  

 

 

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Apr 15, 2023 - May 31, 2024
EnchantOrama! New Mexico Magazine Celebrates 100
New Mexico History Museum
NMHM Herzstein Gallery

The New Mexico History Museum, with support from New Mexico Magazine, proudly presents EnchantOrama! New Mexico Magazine Celebrates 100. Learn why and how the publication began, view a selection from over one thousand magazine covers, and enjoy seeing over two hundred photographs published in the magazine since 1923. Visitors will enjoy a mid-century office space—replete with a rotary telephone—as they peruse previous editions of the magazine or type up an article on a 1970s typewriter. Join us for a free public opening reception in our main lobby, hosted by the MNMF Women’s Board, on Sunday, April 16, 2023 from 1-3pm, with free admission.

Photo Credit: Tourists at Mesa Encantada near Acoma Pueblo, 1954. Photograph by Harvey Caplin. Palace of the Governors Photo Archives Neg. No. 058264

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Apr 3, 2023 - Apr 3, 2025
The Santos of New Mexico
New Mexico History Museum

As part of our Highlights from the Collection: The Larry and Alyce Frank Collection of Santos (saints), in the Palace of the Governors features sixty retablos (devotional paintings on panel) and bultos (carved religious sculptures) from 1810-1880. They were acquired by the museum in 2007, and previously on display as part of the Tesoros de Devocion/Treasures of Devotion exhibition from 2008-2018. Bultos and retablos were created for villages and Pueblo churches, home altars, and the private devotional chapter houses of lay brotherhoods, known commonly to outsiders as Penitentes to promote and teach the Catholic religion in Spanish-speaking and Native communities. Experience works from master santeros (saint-makers) José Rafael Aragón, Molleno, the Laguna Santero, José Aragón, and more! 

Photo credit: 

José Rafael Aragón, Santa Rita de Casia, 1821-1862. Larry and Alyce Frank Collection. NMHM/DCA 2007.032.035

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Apr 1, 2023 - Apr 1, 2025
Silver and Stones: Collaborations in Southwest Jewelry
New Mexico History Museum

Currently on display in the New Mexico History Museum’s Palace of the Governors, is an unusual jewelry collection from the 1940s and 1950s that exemplifies a beneficial economic relationship between Diné (Navajo) silversmith, David Taliman (1901–1967), and Jewish merchant, William C. Ilfeld (1905–1979). William C. Ilfeld was the grandson of the Jewish pioneer Charles Ilfeld, who emigrated from Germany in 1865. William managed the Native American jewelry department at the family’s department store in Las Vegas, New Mexico. Taliman worked in several trading post shops including Maisel’s in Albuquerque and Julius Gan’s Southwest Arts and Crafts in Santa Fe. Ilfeld’s designs were produced by Native artisans, like Taliman, who often used stones from his personal collection. The jewelry was donated by Ilfeld to the New Mexico History Museum in 1971 and is part of the museum’s permanent collection.

Photo credit: Necklace; David Taliman (Diné) 1940s–1950s, Commissioned by William C. Ilfeld-New Mexico History Museum (NMHM/DCA), 05355.45

 

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Jan 29, 2023 - Nov 3, 2024
La Cartonería Mexicana / The Mexican Art of Paper and Paste
Museum of International Folk Art

Mexican cartonería is an artform that expresses human imagination, emotion, and tradition using the simple materials of paper and paste to create a diverse array of subjects such as piñatas, dolls, Day of the Dead skeletons, and fantastical animals called alebrijes.  The first exhibition to focus exclusively on a Mexican folk art tradition in many years, La Cartonería Mexicana showcases more than 100 historic sculptures from the Museum of International Folk Art’s Permanent Collection, many of which have never been displayed.   

The exhibition takes place in our Hispanic Heritage Wing, one of the few museum wings in the United States which devotes space to display the art and heritage of Hispanic and Latino culture.

 

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Jul 2, 2022 - Jul 2, 2028
Here, Now and Always
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
Opening July 2, 3, 2022

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture invites you to visit its brand new permanent exhibition, Here, Now and Always, opening July 2 and 3, 2022 on Museum Hill in Santa Fe.

Here, Now and Always centers on the voices, perspectives, and narratives of the Indigenous peoples of the American Southwest.

This groundbreaking exhibition features more than six hundred objects from the museum’s extraordinary collection of ceramics, jewelry, paintings, fashion, and more.

Learn more and plan your visit now at https://indianartsandculture.org

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Long Term Exhibition
Early Agriculture
New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum

People have been growing food in what is now New Mexico for 4,000 years.

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Long Term Exhibition
The Palace Seen and Unseen: A Convergence of History and Archaeology
New Mexico History Museum

Reflecting current archaeological and historical perspectives, Palace Seen and Unseen draws from historic documents, photographs, and archaeological and architectural studies produced by its former residents, visitors, stewards, and scholars. When the dynamic expertise of historians and archaeologists converges, a richer story and better understanding emerges. It is this integrative approach to what is seen and unseen that guides the themes explored by this exhibition. On long term view. 

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Oct 18, 2019 - Oct 18, 2026
Working on the Railroad
New Mexico History Museum

Working on the Railroad pays tribute to the people who moved the rail industry throughout New Mexico.

Using nearly forty images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and the Library of Congress, this exhibition offers an in-depth look at the men and women who did everything from laying track to dispatching the engines. Wrenches, lanterns, tie dating nails and other objects from the New Mexico History Museum collections will be displayed to give additional life to the photos; many hands used those tools to ensure that each engine ran smoothly and successfully.

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Long Term Exhibition
The Massacre of Don Pedro Villasur
New Mexico History Museum

This exhibition features 23 original graphic history art works by Santa Fe-based artist Turner Avery Mark-Jacobs. This display, ’The Massacre of Don Pedro Villasur,’ narrates the history of an ill-fated Spanish colonial military expedition which set out from Santa Fe in 1720. This depicted story shares the exhibit room with the History Museum’s Segesser I and II Hide paintings located in the Telling New Mexico gallery.  

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Long Term Exhibition
The First World War
New Mexico History Museum
Exhibition opened on the 100th anniversary of Armistice

The First World War exhibition investigates the contributions of New Mexicans to the war, through letters, photographs and objects.

“New Mexico played an important role in both world wars,” said Andrew Wulf, then-Director of the New Mexico History Museum. “We are proud to be able to recognize and remember that contribution and add The First World War as a permanent exhibition, to underscore the sacrifice and heartfelt letters home from these brave soldiers.”

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Long Term Exhibition
New Mexico Colonial Home - Circa 1815
New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum

The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked like.

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Long Term Exhibition
Icons of Exploration
New Mexico Museum of Space History

Showcases some of the Museum’s most celebrated objects including a real "moon rock," rare replicas of the first man-made satellites, Sputnik and Explorer, and the Gargoyle, an early guided missile.

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Long Term Exhibition
John P. Stapp Air & Space Park
New Mexico Museum of Space History

Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankinds exploration of space.

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Dec 7, 2014 - Dec 31, 2024
Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy
New Mexico History Museum

Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy, in the New Mexico History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, helps tell those stories. Setting the Standard uses artifacts from the museum’s collection, images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and loans from other museums and private collectors. Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the tale will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.

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Long Term Exhibition
Multiple Visions: A Common Bond
Museum of International Folk Art
Permanent Exhibit

Multiple Visions: A Common Bond has been the destination for well over a million first-time and repeat visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art. First, second, third, or countless times around, we find our gaze drawn by different objects, different scenes. With more than 10,000 objects to see, this exhibition continues to enchant museum visitors, staff and patrons. Explore highlights from the GIRARD WING.

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Jan 15, 2010 - Jan 15, 2025
Michael Naranjo Touching Beauty Exhibit
New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs

On display in the Bataan Building Atrium Gallery: Touching Beauty Now, sculpture by Santa Clara Pueblo’s Michael Naranjo, celebrated the world over for his bronze and stone forms suspended in fluid, graceful movement.

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Long Term Exhibition
Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now
New Mexico History Museum

Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now sweeps across more than 500 years of history—from the state’s earliest inhabitants to the residents of today. These stories breathe life into the people who made the American West: Native Americans, Spanish colonists, Mexican citizens, Santa Fe Trail riders, fur trappers, outlaws, Buffalo Soldiers, railroad workers, miners, scientists, hippies, artists, and photographers. 

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Long Term Exhibition
Segesser Hide Paintings
New Mexico History Museum

Though the source of the Segesser Hide Paintings is obscure, their significance cannot be clearer: the hides are rare examples of the earliest known depictions of colonial life in the United States. Moreover, the tanned and smoothed hides carry the very faces of men whose descendants live in New Mexico today.

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